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You Won’t Believe What Classic Game Has Gone Woke!

Hasbro now plans to bring Monopoly into the increasingly “woke” 21st century.

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According to the NY Post, Monopoly has gone “woke.”

“After 85 years of cheap hospital bills, moderate stock earnings and maturing “Christmas funds” (whatever that means), Hasbro now plans to bring Monopoly into the increasingly “woke” 21st century.

“The game-maker has decided to update its 16 Community Chest cards, which featured outdated prompts such as winning a “beauty contest,” actually receiving a “tax refund” or the now-rarely seen “bank error in your favor.”

Trending on PolitiCrossing.com: The Dead Do Tell Tales

“In their place are more contemporary cards that evoke community service and social awareness. Swaps could include a reward for “shopping local all week,” rescuing a shelter pet or helping tend the community garden. But Hasbro wants players to decide which to include via voting.”

If you want to vote on the new cards they are going to use, click here.

What are some of the options for cards? Here are a few:

According to Wikipedia:

Monopoly is a board game currently published by Hasbro. In the game, players roll two six-sided dice to move around the game board, buying and trading properties, and developing them with houses and hotels. Players collect rent from their opponents, with the goal being to drive them into bankruptcy. Money can also be gained or lost through Chance and Community Chest cards, and tax squares; players can end up in jail, from which they cannot move until they have met one of several conditions. The game has numerous house rules, and hundreds of different editions exist, as well as many spin-offs and related media. Monopoly has become a part of international popular culture, having been licensed locally in more than 103 countries and printed in more than 37 languages.

Monopoly is derived from The Landlord’s Game created by Lizzie Magie in the United States in 1903 as a way to demonstrate that an economy that rewards wealth creation is better than one where monopolists work under few constraints,[1] and to promote the economic theories of Henry George—in particular his ideas about taxation. The Landlord’s Game had two sets of rules originally, one with taxation and another one mainly based on current rules. When Monopoly was first published by Parker Brothers in 1935, it did not include the less capitalistic taxation rule, which resulted in a more competitive game. Parker Brothers was eventually absorbed into Hasbro in 1991. The game is named after the economic concept of monopoly—the domination of a market by a single entity.

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Education

Did You Stay 33 Feet Away From Everyone?

Once even a bogus rule is put in place it’s difficult to eliminate it

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This Christmas, did you stay 33 feet away from everyone? I didn’t think so. How about six feet, does that seem more reasonable? Guess again. Once a rule is put in place it’s difficult to eliminate it even though the original reasons for its generation are long gone, according to author Roger von Oech. His prime example:

In the 1870s the leading manufacturer of typewriters at the time received complaints that too many of the typewriter keys were sticking together if the operator went too fast. In response to this, the company produced the QWERTY type keyboard — a configuration standard on all keyboards — to slow down operators so that the keys wouldn’t jam together.

Today, technology permits us to produce typewriter keyboards that can operate much faster than any human could possibly type, such as Dvorak keyboards, but the QWERTY configuration still dominates and likely will for the foreseeable future. Concurrently, six feet of social distancing is a farce, held over from some bogus rule years ago.

Trending on PolitiCrossing.com: The Dead Do Tell Tales

Anthony Fauci should know better, but he has been compromised and corrupted in so many ways, and has lied so often to Congress and the media about his projects and funding objectives, that his advice and proclamations are valueless; actually less than valueless. A cough or a sneeze, even through many types of masks, can travel 28 to 33 feet.

The nugget for us all: introduce new rules, new regulations, and new procedures carefully, and scientifically or analytically monitor their long term effectiveness.  Otherwise you’re selling snake oil.

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Business

Gone in an Instant

Our e-files are so fragile that they can be gone in a moment’s notice

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Many people retain all of their text messages with their various correspondents. My daughter Valerie, for example, has more than one hundred text message correspondents — in other words, a running dialogue for each of the people with whom she sends and receives text. I only maintain two such longitudinal files, and one is with Valerie. With friends, relatives, clients, and acquaintances, I save the text streams for a few days or weeks, but then clear them out.

One evening, my sister Nancy texted me, and I texted her back. We went back and forth for a while. So, my message roster now included both Valerie Davidson and Nancy Davidson. After a while, I decided to clear the Nancy Davidson file, and you know what’s coming. I hit the wrong “Davidson,” file, and in an instant, more than a thousand texts between my daughter and myself were gone.

These texts included photos she had sent that I hadn’t yet downloaded, the picture of her new ring,  emojis that we passed back and forth, and everything else that transpired between us.

Trending on PolitiCrossing.com: The Dead Do Tell Tales

Our Texting History, Vanished

I was beyond crestfallen. I felt as if I had lost something near and dear to me. It was devastating. I sat down in the big chair in my office and contemplated the possibilities. I contacted my computer guru and asked him if a deleted text message file was retrievable. He said with my Android system there was no such capability, only on iPhones. I called my sister and explained what I had done. She commiserated.

Then I sat down again, for a long time, and I thought about a friend who had lost her 23-year-old daughter and only child, seven months earlier…

I called my daughter, and I gave her the news. She didn’t seem concerned. I explained to her that she was the only one with whom I had maintained the longitudinal text trail. She told me that she maintains the text trail with everybody. “It’s not like you’re going to run out of room.” I asked her if she knew of any way that it could be retrieved. She didn’t know, either. We parted company.

Eureka! If she never deletes text message histories, then she has everything that’s transpired between us. I called her back, and she said she did have them all. So, on another day, when we figure out how to transfer what she has back to me, or least downloaded them into some text file, barring her losing her phone or accidentally hitting the delete button like I did, our texting history will be intact on my device.

A Fresh Start

I feel like I’ve been given a new lease on life. The greater question now is, what kind of technology and what kind of lives do we lead when a longitudinal history can be wiped out by mistake in single second?

It is not comforting to know that critical files can be gone in a flash, but this is a condition of our era. For thousands of years, people simply spoke to each other with no way of recording anything, or even knowing it would one day be possible. Relationships right up to the 1960’s were based on real time conversations in person or on the phone. Answering machines existed in the early 1960’s but were not widely available until the mid 1980’s.

As technology became more and more powerful, as we all know, everyone has the capability today to save and store virtually every encounter that they have with anyone else in the world. Still, it is disquieting to know that our e-files are so fragile that they can be gone in a moment’s notice.

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