We’re Forgetting Fathers When it Comes to Resolving Abortion and School Shooters ⋆ Politicrossing
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We’re Forgetting Fathers When it Comes to Resolving Abortion and School Shooters

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Father’s Day is coming up as well as Juneteenth, a reminder about the sad situation of many fathers, especially black fathers, who are not involved in their children’s lives. Two issues in the news lately directly related to this are the Supreme Court’s forthcoming opinion reversing Roe v. Wade and an epidemic of mass shootings, particularly school shootings. People are rushing to propose solutions, but most of them fail to mention the glaring elephant in the room — absence of fathers. Hardly anyone ever talks about fathers’ rights to their babies when abortion is brought up, and hardly anyone ever observes the common denominator when it comes to school shootings; the lack of fathers in the troubled teenage boys’ lives. 

 

One man has been tirelessly talking and educating people about this crucial aspect for years, Dr. Warren Farrell. Farrell is author of The Boy Crisis, which he briefed the White House on under President Donald Trump, and which led to legislation on the Fatherhood Crisis being signed into law in Florida by Gov. Ron De Santis. 

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Farrell studied school shootings and determined the factor that should be looked at — instead of blaming access to guns, Great Replacement-style hatred, mental illness, or violence in the movies and video games — is whether the boys had their fathers in their lives. We know the backgrounds of six of the seven school shooters in the 21st century who killed 10 or more people, and all six of those boys were deprived of their biological fathers. 

 

Uvalde shooter Salvador Ramos’s father was rarely present in his life. The teen suffered from a speech impediment that he was bullied over, and barely failed to graduate from high school. He got into a dispute with his grandmother over not graduating, which led to him shooting and killing her before he went on his shooting spree at the school. The guns were his way of saying, “I have a type of power,” Warren said, “they’re compensations for his powerlessness.”

 

All 63 of the largest developed nations are suffering this boy crisis. Guns merely serve to magnify the problem.   

 

Now look at teenage girls, Farrell advises. “Our daughters live in the same families, with the same family values, and have the same access to the same guns, and the same video games, and the same media, and they suffer similar mental illnesses.” So why aren’t there teenage girl shooters? 

 

“Boys whose pain is ignored will communicate their pain as loudly as they can, with guns as large as they can get,” Farrell believes. In school, boys often learn about toxic masculinity, male privilege, the oppressive patriarchy and that the future is female. This does not inspire a boy for their future. In all 63 developed nations, boys fall behind girls in almost every academic subject, especially reading and writing, which are the biggest predictors of success or failure. 

 

Conservatives say toxic masculinity is a myth, whereas liberals talk about male privilege. But Warren says there is such a thing as toxic masculinity, it just doesn’t come from male privilege. It comes from training our men to be disposable in war, where you have to disconnect from your feelings. It’s a social bribe to devalue yourself. For example, he explains, “If a sergeant in the army makes a racist comment about your background, and you object, you are laughed at and punished.”

 

Farrell said several months ago a young man contacted him and thanked him for his book, told him it stopped him from going on a mass shooting spree. He said he’d even written a manifesto in preparation. Through Farrell understanding what was going on in his head, it took away his energy of needing to be heard. Farrell, who specializes in couples counseling which he provides at Esalen, said about 80% of relationship issues can be solved by just hearing the other person out. 

 

In regards to abortion, no one is considering the fathers’ rights, Farrell says. It’s a false dichotomy to make the choice only between the right to life vs. a woman’s body and the right to choose. We leave out the third right. That’s the right of the dad to allow the fetus to live, which should trump the right of the mom to kill the fetus. 

 

He describes it as the ABCs of abortion: Abortion, Birth and Caring. Caring is the dad’s right to be informed immediately that the mom is considering abortion, so he has a timely choice to legally decide whether he will legally affirm that he will care for the infant both emotionally and financially from birth to age 18. It’s not right that mothers get an exclusive right to decide whether to abort a child or put it up for adoption. Mothers only have to deal with the nine months of pregnancy, they can drop the baby off at a fire station and will not be required to pay child support.

 

As for the B, Dads should have birth control responsibilities, but sadly pharmaceutical companies have shown no interest in marketing a birth control pill for men, despite the technology finally becoming available. 

 

Unfortunately, when Farrell goes into court to testify about fatherlessness, many mothers’ attorneys shut him down, they try to stop him before he even starts talking. They do everything they can to distract the judge and interrupt him. The reality is, the court of law is the last place where we should be addressing this, he says. 

 

Farrell said the 1965 Moynihan report is still true today, which found that the breakdown of marriage in black communities was responsible for poverty and related problems. The left is hurting black families the worst by not acknowledging the need for fathers; while 19% of white children live in a single-mother household, over 50% of black children do.  

 

Those familiar with Farrell’s work can’t decide whether he’s stating the obvious or something revolutionary. I think it’s both — something that’s just gone under the radar, since for various, unfair reasons society has not encouraged this type of thinking.

 

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Rachel Alexander is a conservative political writer and pundit. She is the editor of Intellectual Conservative and a recovering attorney. She was ranked by Right Wing News as one of the 50 Best Conservative Columnists from 2011-2019.



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Faith

The New Democratic Sex Cult

They have stopped worshipping the Creator and instead worship the created.

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The Democrats have become a sex cult. Sex is their religion. They have exchanged worshipping God the Creator and instead worship sex, the created. PolitiCrossing founder Chris Widener explains in this short video and gives you the true answer on how to defeat the sex cult. Read Romans 1:18-27 below the video, then watch the video.

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From Romans 1:18-27

18 The wrath of God is being revealed from heaven against all the godlessness and wickedness of people, who suppress the truth by their wickedness, 19 since what may be known about God is plain to them, because God has made it plain to them. 20 For since the creation of the world God’s invisible qualities—his eternal power and divine nature—have been clearly seen, being understood from what has been made, so that people are without excuse.

21 For although they knew God, they neither glorified him as God nor gave thanks to him, but their thinking became futile and their foolish hearts were darkened. 22 Although they claimed to be wise, they became fools 23 and exchanged the glory of the immortal God for images made to look like a mortal human being and birds and animals and reptiles.

24 Therefore God gave them over in the sinful desires of their hearts to sexual impurity for the degrading of their bodies with one another. 25 They exchanged the truth about God for a lie, and worshiped and served created things rather than the Creator—who is forever praised. Amen.

26 Because of this, God gave them over to shameful lusts. Even their women exchanged natural sexual relations for unnatural ones. 27 In the same way the men also abandoned natural relations with women and were inflamed with lust for one another. Men committed shameful acts with other men, and received in themselves the due penalty for their error.

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Faith

Unleash the Spirit Within

It doesn’t take considerable effort to engage in spiritual-type behavior that will benefit everyone

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You can practice being more spiritual in little ways that add up quickly to your being a more spiritual person. For example, there are relatively minor things you can do to start the process, although nothing is minor when it comes to acting spiritually. As an example, if you smile at someone, they tend to smile back. If you go out of your way to help someone, that person might in turn help another and so on.

Spirituality certainly does not have to be restricted to the confines of organized religion. Freed from the rules, restrictions, and impediments that organized religion may impose upon you, how and where might you be more spiritual in your life?

Each little action sets in motion the potential for greater good. So, as you proceed through six items below, do not discount the value of engaging in any of these. Each has the potential to add up to more.

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Spirituality While Driving

Researchers report that when people get in their cars, they think they’re in some type of invisible vehicle. No one sees them as they motor down the road. If you curse or scream, who’s to know? Obviously, you’re not invisible and the way you conduct yourself as a motorist potentially impacts other motorists, as well as pedestrians.

The next time someone cuts you off in traffic, fails to use their turn signal properly or otherwise engages in improper driving, practice maintaining your composure.

Don’t curse, scream, or honk your horn. If the other person is in view, look at them blankly, but not with disgust or anger, or a mocking smile.

Often, the other party knows what they did wrong. If not, venting your spleen is not likely to change their behavior.

If you travel frequently, say as part of your job, and often traverse high traffic arteries, chances are you’ll have an opportunity at least several times a week to practice engaging in small displays of spirituality. As a goal, why not establish for yourself one composed response per week?

Each time you can remain composed, you increase the probability that you will be more composed in other aspects of your life. Perhaps you’ll even be kinder to people in face-to-face encounters when they commit a transgression.

Comfort the Less Fortunate

As a small gesture of spirituality, what can you do for someone you see right on the street? It’s one thing to write a check to charity; it’s another to encounter someone who is in need and aid that person on the spot.

When you have shoes that you no longer wear, but are not necessarily in pieces, keep them in your trunk as you motor around town. Then, if you see a homeless person with less than sufficient footwear, and it looks like you might be roughly the same size, pull over.

Promptly get the shoes from your trunk, walk up to the person and say that you want them to accept the shoes. If he or she accepts, fine, bid them good day, and be on your way. If he or she chooses not to take them, that’s okay too.

Your goal in this area could be to give away each pair of shoes or other worthwhile item of clothing that you no longer want, perhaps on a monthly basis.

Participate in Group Action

If this is not for you, volunteer once a month to serve a meal at a local shelter for the homeless. If you’re a busy career type, perhaps serving dinner will work best for you. Whatever your preconceived notions about this may be, once you actually serve dinner to real live people, you’ll see that reality is different than you thought.

Perhaps you think that people would be reluctant to speak up for what they wanted. Or worse, they’d be groveling, and you would have to do your best to remain humble. Perhaps you feel like you’ll seem to be some kind of “goody-two-shoes,” dispensing dinners with an overly pleasant, “And how are you this evening? Here’s a nice dinner for you.”

Actually, none of the above usually happens. Person to person, you simply serve another, as if you were in partnership. More peas? Fewer carrots? It’s much more matter-of-fact than you might imagine. They’re appreciative but not groveling.

Note: Some people who show up at a shelter are well dressed. Perhaps they’re temporarily unemployed, or they had a financial emergency they were unprepared to handle.

The more often you serve others in this way, the easier it becomes to do it again. You start to get the notion that there are a lot more similarities between human beings than differences. The old axiom, “There but for the grace of God, go I,” is much more true than we all often acknowledge.

Look for the Good in Others

Is there a co-worker with whom you have had a nasty relationship? Is there something good about this co-worker that you can draw upon, so that you can get yourself to  say something nice to him/her at your next encounter?

Will Rogers, a political satirist, entertainer, and beloved figure in the first half of the twentieth century allegedly said, “I never met a man I didn’t like.” Many people have interpreted Will Rogers to have meant that he could find something admirable in everyone he met. So, too, can we all.

Is there a neighbor with whom you have had a continuing squabble? What would it do to your relationship if you sent your neighbor a card or a brief note that said something along the lines of, “I noticed how lovely your garden was the other day, and wanted to let you know that I appreciate the work you’ve done in maintaining it.”? Too syrupy, or, pardon the expression, too flowery? Guess again.

List five people at work or elsewhere in your life with whom you may not have a good relationship, but whom you can acknowledge. Next to each person’s name, write a dash and then what is good about them.

You’re going to be on Earth for a finite amount of time. Do you want to go through your life trading hostilities with people, never having the where-with-all to restore some semblance of civility to the relationship?

Listen More Closely

Human beings have a profound need to be heard. When you give others your full and complete attention, in essence, you’re telling them that you value them as a people. All activity and concerns in your life stop as the words and emotions of another person take on paramount importance.

Listening is one of people’s most underrated skills. Your ability to listen to another person, giving him or her your full and undivided attention, can be an act of spirituality, particularly if the other person needs someone to listen to him/her. In this rush-rush world, too often we want people to summarize everything they say.

Consider the people in your life who have mattered the most to you and, chances are, they were the people that listened to you best. Whether it was your parents, a brother or sister, a good friend, a relative, a teacher, a coach, a coworker, a mentor, or just somebody down the street, you tend to value those who value you by listening.

In Siddhartha, by Herman Hesse, the young Siddhartha speaks about his most well-developed skills. He can listen, he can fast, and he can wait.

These talents don’t seem like much to the Western mind, but they’re handy if you want to increase the spirituality of your life. As a goal, why not to listen in earnest to one person per week in the workplace whom you would not have otherwise given such time and attention?

At home, give your significant other one good listening to per day, and I promise things will go better. Do the same with each child.

Judge Deeds, Not People

Judgment is a necessary and practical skill. It’s likely that you judge things, including others, all day long. After all, if you want to choose the colleges appropriate for you, friends that share similar values, and the professional, social, and civic groups that you will enjoy being a part of, you need to make some judgments.

We all judge one another, however, sometimes harshly. Everyone can learn from each other. It is so easy to fall into that game, as psychologist Carl Rogers articulated, of “mine is better than yours.” It is too convenient to conclude that people who walk, talk, or look differently than we do, must be vastly different, and by extension, inferior.

As you might have already concluded, it doesn’t take considerable effort to be spiritual and to engage in spiritual-type behavior that will benefit yourself, and benefit others. The opportunities are all around each of us, every day. All we have to do is be aware.

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