Too Loud, Too Bright, Too Fast, Too Tight ⋆ Politicrossing
Connect with us

Life

Too Loud, Too Bright, Too Fast, Too Tight

About 15% of the population can’t tune out harmless sensations and react to them with irritation, anger, or alarm

Published

on

Too Loud, Too Bright, Too Fast, Too Tight: What to do with you’re sensory defensive in an overstimulating world, by Sharon Heller, Ph.D is a remarkable book for those of us who, given the choice, would have opted for a quieter world with fewer distractions. Here are my notes and excerpts from the book:

Sensory Defensiveness

Some 15% of the population can’t tune out harmless sensations and instead react to them with irritation, anger, and alarm.

Common symptoms of sensory defensiveness include recoiling from light, being startled by loud or sudden sounds, being unable to shut out constant noise, wanting to remove tags and labels from your close, avoiding tight-fitting clothes or belts, and avoiding jewelry or anything that hangs from your neck.

Also, being upset when someone touches you unexpectedly or from behind, feeling hot or cold easily, seeking to avoid situations where your senses will be stressed, becoming easily frustrated, and feeling anxious much of the time.

Overloaded

Modern life overloads our eyes, ears, and nose, and robs us of touch and movement. Some people, with a low sensory threshold, quickly reach their saturation point and are overstimulated by sensation. To avoid over-stimulation they direct their attention inward appear restrained and inhibited. Defensive reactions to sensations include:

* being irritated standing in line
* being fussy about rough or synthetic textures in clothing
* frequently adjusting one’s clothes
* over dressing to minimize skin exposure
* avoid touching certain textures

* being excessively ticklish
* bothered by creams or lotions
* picky about food
* under reacting to pain, or
* overreacting to pain

* easily cold or easily hot
* annoyed by vibration
* unnerved by loud bass sounds
* easily distracted by ambient noise
* hearing sounds to faint for others to hear

* annoyed by objects too close to your face
* overstimulated by eye contact
* smelling odors before others
* becoming light-headed or nauseous from chemical smells
* disliking certain food smells

Self-Preservation

Each of us acts in accordance with the information our senses receive. If we feel overwhelmed, we seek to defend against over-stimulation and preserve the self. Even when our sensory defensiveness is mild, coping with sensory invasion creates layers of problems that, in unsuspected ways, affect every aspect of life and prevent us from knowing the full range of human experience.

Wired from stress, we might seem fidgety, agitated, short tempered, impulsive, patient, or volatile. Needing to withdraw from stimulation we might appear preoccupied, unfriendly, or reclusive and such behavior compromises relationships.

A sensory diet might include brushing your skin daily at specific intervals, listening to music that help you to better integrate sensor sensory processing, dancing freely to music, doing breathing exercises, and practicing yoga. Also, jumping on trampoline, bouncing on an exercise ball, and swinging in a hammock.

Calmness at Last

After, you might feel a calmness that you never previously knew. And, when you feel grounded, you are less inclined to be irritated by sensory overload.

– – – – –

 

 

We'd love to hear your thoughts about this article. Please take a minute to share them in the comment section by clicking here. Or carry the conversation over on your favorite social network by clicking one of the share buttons below.


Jeff Davidson is the world's only holder of the title "The Work-Life Balance Expert®" as awarded by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. He is the premier thought leader on work-life balance, integration, and harmony. Jeff speaks to organizations that seek to enhance their overall productivity by improving the effectiveness of their people. He is the author of Breathing Space, Simpler Living, Dial it Down, and Everyday Project Management. Visit www.BreathingSpace.com for more information on Jeff's keynote speeches and seminars, including: Managing the Pace with Grace® * Achieving Work-Life Balance™ * Managing Information and Communication Overload®



 
 
 

Join the conversation!

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, profanity, vulgarity, doxing, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain fruitful conversation.



Life

Provocative Questions to Get You Moving

What would make you pause and think about what’s really important?

Published

on

Suppose I asked you four questions to make you pause, think about what’s really important, perhaps take some action steps, and get you moving in a positive direction. What might I ask?

Here are four such questions:

* What would you do if you truly only had six months to live?

* What would you read if you could only pick six books for the rest of your life?

* If you could return to any age what would it be?

* If you could live anywhere other than here, where would it be?

 

By way of example, here is each question with my own answers to help stimulate your thinking:

What would I do if I truly only had six months to live? I would visit everyone who ever mattered to me one more time; visit all my childhood haunts; visit three or four tourist destinations in the world that I’ve wanted to see; eat like an incredible pig; parcel out my assets carefully and accordingly, safeguard my daughter’s financial future and well-being to the best of my abilities; and donate many items to charity.

If I could only read six books for the rest of my life, they would probably be The Timetables of History, Childhood’s End, The Call of the Wild, The One Hundred, From Dawn to Decadence, and The Culture of Celebrity. Runners-up would be The Demon-Haunted World, Crime and Punishment, Moby Dick, MacBeth, The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, and The World of Our Fathers

If I could be any age what would I be: 38, because at that age I had the optimal mix of capabilities and faculties, unbounded potential, and unbridled enthusiasm. My career as an author was beginning to bloom and amazingly I hadn’t yet been on my first of 45 cruises.

If I could live anywhere other than here, where would it be and why aren’t I there? The places I could settle include Asheville, NC; Austin, TX; Monterrey, CA; Sausalito, CA; Tucson, AZ; Las Vegas, NV; Vancouver, British Columbia; London, England; Paris, France; Vevey, Switzerland; Montreux, Switzerland; Bruges, Belgium; Helsinki, Finland; Gothenburg, Sweden; Stockholm, Sweden, and any place where it is spring, birds are chirping, and large lakes invite you to swim.

– – – – –

 

 

Continue Reading

Life

21 Ways That People with Work-life Balance Are Different from Others (Part 3)

Even in our fast-paced society, slowing down is continually attainable

Published

on

Here is the final set of seven ways the people who have attained work-life balance set themselves apart from the rest:

15) The typical person is easily distracted by daily noise and interruptions. Those with work-life balance monitor and manage their personal space to minimize distractions.
* carry ear plugs
* sound proof your workspace
* find alternative work locations and spaces, such as a picnic table or park bench * visit www.yogasleep.com

16) The typical person focuses on finishing the workday in order to drop back and relax. Those with work-life balance are productive at work and have a life for the rest of the day after work.
* leave work at a reasonable hour
* reduce TV watching and web surfing
* employ your den as a mini-gym
* engage in invigorating leisure

17) The typical person engages in inactive leisure, i.e. watching TV, web surfing. Those with work-life balance employ leisure for novel experiences, learning, and physical activity.
* live closer, not farther from work
* rediscover hobbies
* join group activities
* peruse local event notices and attend

18) The typical person intermittently invests in his or her own well-being. Those with work-life balance strategically purchase goods and services that support their well-being.
* buy in multiples when all supplies will eventually be used up
* make strategic purchases…
* if it saves one hour a week
* if it takes up little space, is portable, expandable, flexible, can be traded in

19) The typical person longs for the good old days when the pace of life was slower. Those with work-life balance recognize that even in our fast-paced society, slowing down is continually attainable.
* acknowledge and accept the world as it is
* seek to change aspects of your personal environment over which you have control
* consider the 80-20 rule and ignore low-payoff tasks and activities
* emulate the role models in your industry, organization, or profession

20) The typical person over-collects work-life balance tips hoping that such information will rub off on them. Those who have work-life balance ingest the insights of others, and ultimately follow the beat of their own drum.
* put what you learn into motion
* adopt new behaviors until they become habits
* establish new personal systems
* develop rewarding rituals

21) The typical parent passes their hectic lifestyle on to their children. Those who have it teach their children what is needed to continually experience work-life balance
* remember: children learn most from observation
* exhibit behaviors that you want them to emulate
* include them in activities, ask for their opinion
* act accordingly: actions speak louder than words

– – – – – –

 

 

Continue Reading

 

Our Newsletter

Become a Politicrossing insider: Sign up for our free email newsletter, and we'll make sure to keep you in the loop.

Sites We Like

Our Newsletter

Become a PolitiCrossing insider: Sign up for our free email newsletter, and we'll make sure to keep you in the loop.

Trending