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The Lunacy of Left on Full Display

The Left loves total authority and imposing its will on all of us, forevermore.

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In another life, I leaned left on nearly all issues of the day… Then reality kicked in. Today, I find almost every liberal or leftist viewpoint, from no need for voter ID, to restrictions on the First Amendment, to be harmful to society. The prolonged and now questionable lockdown over COVID-19, their willingness to upend women’s sports, and Biden’s laxity about illegals further exacerbates my feeling that that Left loves the idea of total authority and of imposing its will on all of us, forevermore.

Good By You?

Do you believe as leftists do, for example, that children may choose their gender? Is it okay to teach children that there are more than 50 genders? Do you think that cross-dressers should be reading to children at story hour?

Should mathematics, the sciences, and other core academic disciplines be taught to accommodate ‘politically diverse’ points of view? Is the 1619 the date of our founding? Should entire college curricula be redesigned because most of the great works of literature throughout history have been written by white males?

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Should student loan debt be exonerated? Are you fine with colleges holding separate graduation exercises and celebrations for different ethnic minorities? Are you upset when conservative speakers on campus are disrupted from speaking, or are banned altogether from campus? Should colleges set up safe spaces? Curiously, can a university promise students an unbiased education when 97% of college professors’ political donations go to Democrats?

Is late trimester abortion acceptable? After a baby is born, is it the right of the mother and the doctor to choose whether or not that person will continue to live? Should Medicare be provided for all and, if so, how do you pay for it?

Are illegal immigrants to be given free healthcare the moment they cross the border? Indeed, should we have open borders, and let in anybody who wants to come here? Are sanctuary cities a good idea, and do they support the lives and aspirations of actual American citizens?

A More Civil Society?

When newspaper headlines scream about gun violence, is wringing your hands over the issue any solace for families in Chicago or Baltimore ghetto communities who experience gun violence on a daily basis? Do you care about the issue, or do you only get riled up when the mainstream media stokes your emotions?

Is calling others racist acceptable when, in your own heart, you know that you are biased at times? Is a comment made by a movie star or celebrity – or a politician, for that matter – 30 or 40 years ago enough to cancel his or her career? Tell me, please, is virtue signaling an acceptable form of social participation, or should one actually take appropriate, non-violent action to address a wrong?

Are the goals and violent tactics of Antifa acceptable to you? If they’re proud of what they stand for, and forthright in their actions, why do they wear ski masks? Appearing in selected cities in time to cause trouble, and leading the turmoil following the death of George Floyd last summer, how many of them actually hold jobs? How many pay for their transportation and housing costs?

If they do not pay for themselves, who, pray tell, is paying? Most curiously, why do they often go after the most vulnerable people they can find in any gathering? Is it okay when law enforcement stands down in the face of violence committed by those on the left?

When Minds Can’t Meet

To me, the left now embraces mass insanity and it’s getting more absurd by the week. The lockdown of the last 11 months has given us all a taste of what socialism is like. What’s more, they don’t understand the magnitude and ramifications of many of their political and social views. As the summer riots and continuing mayhem in Portland and Seattle have shown, the left’s agenda will destroy our civilization within a few years.

Ronald Reagan said it best, “Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn’t pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same, or one day we will spend our sunset years telling our children and our children’s children what it was once like in the United States where men [and women] were free.”

It would be wonderful to be able to reach consensus in some way with those on the Left, however my sensibilities cry out and say that would be cultural and national suicide.

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Jeff Davidson is the world's only holder of the title "The Work-Life Balance Expert®" as awarded by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. He is the premier thought leader on work-life balance, integration, and harmony. Jeff speaks to organizations that seek to enhance their overall productivity by improving the effectiveness of their people. He is the author of Breathing Space, Simpler Living, Dial it Down, and Everyday Project Management. Visit www.BreathingSpace.com for more information on Jeff's keynote speeches and seminars, including: Managing the Pace with Grace® * Achieving Work-Life Balance™ * Managing Information and Communication Overload®



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Multi-tasking: More Harm than Good

In this day and age, where so much competes for our attention, it is easy to stray!

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I belong to a local health club, and while I was there one day, I saw a woman get on the Stairmaster. I watched as she whipped out an mp3 player and started listening to music. Then, to my surprise, she reached into her gym bag, pulled out a book, and placed it on that ledge to read. I almost asked her if she would like a piece of gum!

Today, when so much competes for our attention, it is easy to stray! More often than we care to pretend, in the office and at home, we invite more than we can handle, and then act as though we didn’t. As individuals, throughout society, we are trained to believe that the ability to multi-task is a great attribute. Unfortunately, that’s a big mistake. Here’s why, and how to avoid multi-tasking in the future.

First Things First

What’s the fastest and easiest way to handle six tasks competing for our attention? Identify the most important task, second most important, third most important, and so on, then tackle the first and finish it all the way, move on to the second and complete it, then move all the way down the list.

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Any other way of tackling those items, whether they are tasks for home or work, is simply not as efficient. The catch is, any other way is more psychologically satisfying.  Why?  It’s almost as if juggling projects, switching gears unnecessarily or abruptly, or leaving a job unfinished to start a new project gives you the opportunity to say to other people, “Hey, look at me! Look how involved I am! Look at how busy I am! I’m great at multi-tasking.” A multi-tasker, however, can’t compete with others who tackle their to-do list, one item at a time.

What about doubling up as a procedure for tackling a number of routine items or very simple tasks? You can eat dinner and read a book at the same time. Eating and reading at the same time is relatively harmless.

How about driving and talking on the cell phone at the same time? Driving requires your sharp attention, as does carrying on an intelligent conversation with someone else who is not present; doing both at the same time spreads your attention too thin, with often disastrous results. The same is true for projects you’re working on that require your best thinking.

Tips:
* give yourself 5 to 10 minute intervals to focus on the task at hand
* safe-guard your immediate environment to avoid interruptions
* acknowledge yourself whenever you stick to one task and finish it
* repeat all the above, often, knowing that ‘more often’ is better!

Your Undivided Attention

When you’re working on a new task, brainstorming, engaging in first-time thinking, or doing creative work, it’s vital to offer your complete and undivided attention to that one task before you. To dissipate your attention or otherwise stray means you are not going to do your best work.

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Common ‘Wisdom’ that Just Ain’t So

Much of what we read, think, and repeat is not accurate, at all…

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Much of what we read, think, and repeat is not exactly so. For example have you encountered the phrase, “Those who give up liberty for security deserve neither”? Often incorrectly attributed to Benjamin Franklin, the phrase is nonsensical. With no national security, soon enough you’ll have no liberty.

With complete security, you’ll have no liberty as well. A trade-off is always needed. For the record, Benjamin Franklin actually said, “Those who would give up essential liberty, to pursue a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.” That makes more sense.

‘A penny saved is a penny earned’? Once again, Ben Franklin is in the mix. A penny saved is not a penny earned. A penny earned is a penny earned and even then it might not be a full penny depending on taxes, inflation, and other hidden costs and expenses. If you save your money in a long-term CD, you can’t have access to it months. If funds are tied up when you need them that is not a pretty penny.

Trending on PolitiCrossing.com: Tucker: Scarred by Insurrection 2.0

Not Actually

Consider the phrase, “Experience is the best teacher.” Perhaps, this is so, but not as a given. Generally, an excellent teacher is the best teacher. Experience might teach us the wrong lessons or send us down another blind alley. If we don’t fully comprehend the meaning of our experiences,we’re as likely to make bad decisions in the future and have unfortunate experiences as a result.

Closely related is, ‘practice makes perfect.’ Practice does not make perfect. If your practices are off the mark, then you will continue to be imperfect and you might be reinforcing a bad habit. As they say in Tae Kwon Do, “Practice makes permanent.”

On my daughter’s softball team, a young girl named Whitney was regarded as the star pitcher. Yet during the pregame warm-ups, time after time, she could barely throw a strike. With luck, she averaged 20% strikes out of all her pitches thrown. Sure enough, when the game started, she was no better. Why would anybody expect the outcome to be different?

The best chance for you to excel is to have perfect practices. An array of imperfect practices leads failure.

Lemons and Life

‘When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.’ This sounds like good advice, but to actually make and sell lemonade, you’d also need to have clean water, a good lemon press, some type of sweetener, a paring knife, a pitcher, an implement for stirring, and cups. Such bromides leave out 90% of what else you’d need.

Periodically, I encounter authors and speakers who write or say ‘to live life more fully’ by pretending that “you have six months to live.” If you had six months to live you’d engage in behaviors different than now.

You might sell your house. You might go on world travel, or at least travel more than you’ve been doing. You might dissipate your assets. You might spend your money down to nothing, or give it all away. Then, when you undoubtedly live beyond six months, you’re likely to be penniless!

Thank You For Sharing (!)

‘Think outside the box.’ What does the “box” even mean? The phrase has been so overused that it is now rendered meaningless. Would it be better simply to say “expand your thinking,” or “brainstorm,” or “reach beyond the norm”?

‘There is no ‘I’ in team.’ Michael Jordan once remarked that while there is no “I” in team, there certainly is a “me.” Acronyms and creative word use might have their place in a corporate pep rally, otherwise let them be.

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