The Greatest Enemy of Black America: Low Expectations and Pity Brought to You by the Democratic Party ⋆ Politicrossing
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The Greatest Enemy of Black America: Low Expectations and Pity Brought to You by the Democratic Party

No one can be powerful and free, while living in the cloak of victimhood.

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Despite the narrative of the past year blaming and shaming Whites, “structural racism,” and “legacies of slavery” for the condition of Black Americans, I’m dumbfounded by the deafening silence on such issues as Black on Black violence and fatherless households within Black America.

The lack of outrage is most noticeable from those that use guilt, shame and pity as political tactics to continue to make Black Americans believe they are sick and needy to maintain a political base, gain votes and turn away any sense of responsibility from within the Black community itself. Turning one’s back on responsibility is giving up control. Giving up control is ceding power.

Those being blamed and shamed, merely for being born white are guilted and shamed into trying to understand and apologizing without room for sensible discussion or thought. This blame culture creates bitterness and separation. The blame culture reveals the lack of accountability, leadership, and standards within the Black community. No one can be powerful and free, while living in the cloak of victimhood.

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Progress begins from within. Until that truth is embraced by Black America, the progress they are hoping for will be dictated by those whose primary aim is to keep Black America waiting for a savior that will never come. Hope is the great enabler.

Greatness, mediocrity and misery all begin and end with individuals being responsible for their own actions and behaviors and holding those around them to the same standards. These values aren’t the monopoly of one race or ethnic group. These are basic human values. Living by these values is a choice, as is not living by these values.

Strong communities are merely masses of individuals that share and act on high standards and do not tolerate those that choose to reject those standards.

Adhering to high standards isn’t a sometimes thing, done for convenience sake. That is the behavior of the morally and spiritually weak. What you accept, tolerate and expect multiplies.

No election, no politician, no law, no amount of guilting, blaming and shaming will change hearts and minds, or the direction of an individual’s life for the better.

Celebrities, athletes, coaches and other so called “leaders” write and speak about individuals creating their own paths, working hard, fighting through obstacles and taking personal responsibility, but won’t hold a community to those same standards for fear of losing fans. Instead, these individuals will lower those standards for a community and attempt to justify behaviors and actions (or ignore them) that lead to failure. The moral high ground is a shaky place to stand when you pick and choose what to stand for.

Black Americans have contributed greatly to our nation, but their voices have been hijacked by a loud minority demanding more from others, than from themselves. The pace of real progress will be slow until those whose understanding is sought see that personal responsibility and accountability are the norm and not the exception.

Our system rewards individuals that work through the good, the bad and the horrible. Fairness is not a law of nature and can only be brought up so many times before those with sympathy tire of it and demand an evolution in mindset. In other words, your work ethic, effort and mindset should match the weight of the goals you choose to put before you.

It is time to take a stand and choose a side. The weak enable the weak and know only fear, shame and defeat. The strong win, period.

“He who walks with wise men will be wise, But the companion of fools will suffer harm.”

Proverbs 13:20

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Ted is currently a Homicide Investigator in a major metropolitan law enforcement agency. He served two tours of duty in Iraq with the United States Army National Guard as an Infantryman and worked as a private contractor providing security for American diplomats in Iraq.



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Life

130 Things for Which to Be Grateful

Whether it’s a person, object, form of entertainment, place, or concept, everyone can be grateful for many things

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I asked around and learned some of the things for which people express gratitude. Whether it’s a person, object, form of entertainment, place, or concept, everyone can be grateful for many things.

While some items on the list might not apply to you, most are items for which we can all be grateful at one time or another in our lives:

People & Relationships

Family
Friends
Good teachers
Role models
My boyfriend
My girlfriend

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My parents
My children
Babies
Siblings and cousins
Coaches
Mentors

Family reunions
Engagements and weddings
Pets
Nice wait staff
A kind landlord
High school reunion

Health

Generally good health
The ability to walk
Breathing
My genes
Good hearing and eyesight
A Sound Mind

Safety and Security

Police and Fire Departments
U.S. Military
National Weather Service
Freedom of the press
Freedom of religion
Domestic Privacy

Modern Luxuries

Clean water
Mouth wash
Cars
Public transportation
Air conditioning
Clothes that fit

Washers and dryers
Work at home jobs
Being employed
Book publishers
Financial aid
The ability to own property

Technology

GPS
DVR
Pandora
Computers
Smartphones
The Internet

iTunes
Powerpoint
Photographs

Entertainment

Movies
Broadway shows
ESPN and ESPN2
TV news
Learning Channel
History Channel

Fashion
“Retail therapy”
Xbox, Gameboy
Books
Concerts
Art

Sports

Running
Skiing
Rowing
College basketball
Tennis
Skating rinks

NHL
MLB
NBA
WNBA
Olympics
NFL

Foods

Good food
Mexican food
Sushi
Pizza Fruit
Ice cream
Crunchy peanut butter

Cream cheese
Beer
Tea
Chocolate
Asparagus
Miso soup

Places

The USA
National and state parks
Social scenes
Bars
Whole Foods, Earth Fair, and Trader Joe’s
Costco and Sam’s Club

Coffee shops
Public schools and universities
Swimming pools
The beach and mountains
Shopping malls
Cruise ships

Arboretums
Vancouver
Niagra Falls
NYC

Nature

Pretty weather
The arrival of spring
The arrival of fall
Thanksgiving
Freshly cut flowers
First snow

Concepts

Learning
Formal education
Lessons learned
Experiences
Respect
Ability to change

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Life

Authors Who Avoid Hasty Conclusions

Much of the information that we encounter, especially via the internet, is only partially true, if not completely bogus

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So much of the information that we encounter today, especially via the internet, is only partially true, if not completely bogus. As such, I admire the work of selected authors over the past few decades. They remind me to check out what seems to be common knowledge, for the truth the lies beyond it:

Self-help author Denis Waitley observed Albert Einstein always scored quite well in math and science. Some “historians” noted that his top grade of six on a scale of one to six dropped to a level of one from one year to the next, and they arbitrarily assumed he had started to flunk those courses. The school had reversed its grading system, however, to make the highest grade a one instead of a six.

For decades, no one had bothered to examine the original “evidence” leading to the proclamation that Einstein was an academic failure.

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Pop Trends

In her book, Backlash, author Susan Faludi told how “pop” market forecasters made a fortune by reviewing popular media, such as newspapers, television, movies and so forth, and then concluding what trends are looming in America. The extreme fallacy with this method of forecasting, Faludi noted, is that it tends to promulgate that which only a handful of editors, publishers and directors believe or perpetrate. No hard data supports the “forecasts.”

One such forecaster was credited with coining the term “cocooning” for the 1980s, where working men and women, particularly women, decided to spend more time in the household. Faludi shows that the assertion has no relationship to U.S. Department Bureau of Labor Statistics that indicated an increase in the number of women in the workforce and in the time each spent outside the home.

Nevertheless, corporations paid hefty sums to be told where we were all headed next. Because many other factors can obscure results, if the predicted “trend” then doesn’t help the corporate customer, it is rarely linked back to the forecaster. Such companies would do better, observed Faludi, to simply consult the U.S. Bureau of the Census, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, and other sources that independently collect data, presumably with no bias.

Dastardly Dads?

Faludi also uncovered this: The “fact” that an epidemic of divorced fathers refused to pay child care, which is a falsehood that distorted reality for decades. According to U.S. Census Bureau figures, the great majority of fathers with joint custody of their children – nearly 90% – paid their entire support obligation, in full and on time. Some 80% of fathers with visitation privileges, but not joint custody, paid regularly. Only when the courts deprive fathers of both custody and access do support levels drop to under 50%, the figure mistakenly attributed to all fathers.

Despite the strong correlation between a man’s ability to have joint custody or visitation with his children and his willingness to make regular support payments, most legislators and judges didn’t seem to see it. Their automatic and immediate response in cases of nonpayment was to blame the male, instead of enforcing the man’s right to visit his children and encouraging father-child relationships.

By continuing to make the majority of child custody awards to women, the courts systematically disregarded the role fathers played and all but ensured that the children would have adjustment problems. Even if a man legally wins visitation rights, his ability to visit his kids isn’t guaranteed. Judges don’t often put uncooperative mothers in jail. So, fathers end up going to court repeatedly – a costly venture. Sometimes after many attempts to visit their children, some fathers withhold support payments to force what the courts will not.

The media, charging to no one’s rescue and in search of thirty second sound bites, label such fathers as deadbeat, or worse. Hence, the widespread misconception about the true nature of what’s going on in this critical arena continues even to this day.

Abounded Influence

In his acclaimed 1990 book, Agents of Influence, author Pat Choate debunked the myth that the Japanese, as a whole, significantly contributed to the development of innovation and technology as evidenced by their annual lead in the number of U.S. patents they had filed and obtained. As Choate explained, the Japanese tilted the economic playing field, via the ruthless art of “patent flooding.”

When a U.S. firm, for example, applied for a patent representing an innovation on which the Japanese wanted to capitalize, Japanese firms issued a flurry of patent applications that surrounded the technology at hand. Thus, the original developer or inventor could not market his invention  without getting clearance from the Japanese, who could tie up an invention in the courts simply because they held nuisance patents for a component or contributing element to the major patent.

After decades of such tactics, and with China included as a leading culprit, the U.S. government still has failed to install comprehensive, necessary protections to safeguard the toil and genius of the original American patent applicant. As such, our government has unwittingly contributed to the redistribution of billions of dollars in royalties and revenues to others.

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