Send Boatloads, Not Plane Loads, of Migrants to Eastern Seaboard Sanctuary Cities ⋆ Politicrossing
Connect with us

Family

Send Boatloads, Not Plane Loads, of Migrants to Eastern Seaboard Sanctuary Cities

Ultra-wealthy liberal communities don’t want to handle an ultra-thin fraction of border-crossing illegal immigrants

Published

on

The Über-Liberals of Martha’s Vineyard got a tiny, tiny taste of what Texas and Arizona endure every hour, of every day, with no end in sight. What a wonderful glimpse for all the world to see: how an ultra-wealthy, sparsely populated island, in a virtual sanctuary state, handled a thin fraction of border-crossing illegal immigrants, yearning to be free! They sent them away in less than a day.

All those yard signs, all that virtue-signaling, and it all added up to what? Gross hypocrisy. Then the blame game started. DeSantis and Abbott… they are simply evil men, using the poor as political pawns. How do we know? The liberal press is blasting out this message via bullhorns.

As any thinking person knows, the blame lies in Washington, DC thanks to the lax administration of Joe Biden, his lackey Kamala Harris, and the super-incompetent Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, Alejandro Mayorkas.

Making the Dollars Go Further

Apparently Governor DeSantis had to pay handsomely to fly the 50 “exploited souls” to Martha’s Vineyard. However, here is a solution for sending even more, at a far lower cost per person. Buy or rent one of the many cruise ship for sale from the cruise companies which have been hit hard over last 30 months and that now seek to reduce some of their inventory.

Personally, having cruised 39 times, and I can tell you that the these big ships can comfortably accommodate between 2500 passengers. The mega-ships can accommodate 4500. For a short trip up the Atlantic coast, doubling and tripling the number of family members in each room would sum to nearly 10,000 on one voyage. From Texas, navigating the Gulf of Mexico, or directly from Florida, heading up the Atlantic Ocean, a ship could reach Massachusetts within three days.

During the time of the voyage, the facilities on board are excellent. There are health clubs, saunas, steam rooms, a running track, and even a swimming pool or two. These guests of Joe Biden, transported by governors, would actually enjoy themselves on the way up, and then, by golly, be rewarded via the largesse that represents the good people of Massachusetts.

Fulfilling Sanctuary Dreams

Governor DeSantis, as well as Governor Abbott, employing cruise ships could then supply all the sanctuary cities along the Atlantic Seaboard with exactly what they’ve been begging for. After all these years, hey, why not make a wonderful delivery to Baltimore, and then Rehoboth Beach, Delaware where the Bidens frequent?

And how about 1,000s of migrants delivered to Atlantic City, New Jersey, and the Hamptons in Long Island? Don’t forget Bridgeport and New Haven, Connecticut before proceeding to Newport, Rhode Island, Nantucket, and Boston. For good measure make some deliveries to the resort towns in Maine.

What a marvel to behold, as these self-described caring destinations welcome thousands and thousands of migrants, all at once, and artfully absorb them. Sure, there will be some adjustments; such locales will have to spend big bucks for food, shelter, and clothing for these new arrivals… and then find them longer term homes and jobs. So what if local schools are not equipped with foreign language teachers and curricula so that the new children can get up to snuff? Isn’t that what sanctuary cities are all about?

Just Checking In

Let’s revisit all of these places one year later and see exactly how these welcome guests have feared. How about crime? Have they had run-ins with the law? What about the schools? How about public health? Let’s take a very accurate snapshot of what happens on the day they arrived, versus one year later, two years later, and three years later.

Having people dumped into your community, or your home for that matter, despite liberal virtue-signaling, represents a huge change in how you live, and how they live. It’s humanitarian to help a migrant in need. Thousands of migrants, or tens of thousands of them, all at the same time, dropped into a community is not a humanitarian gesture, it is an attack on your way of life.

As Henry Kissinger famously advised then German chancellor Angela Merkel, helping one person in dire need to come to Germany is a humanitarian gesture. Having great masses come to Germany threatens your culture.

– – – – –

 

We'd love to hear your thoughts about this article. Please take a minute to share them in the comment section by clicking here. Or carry the conversation over on your favorite social network by clicking one of the share buttons below.


Jeff Davidson is the world's only holder of the title "The Work-Life Balance Expert®" as awarded by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. He is the premier thought leader on work-life balance, integration, and harmony. Jeff speaks to organizations that seek to enhance their overall productivity by improving the effectiveness of their people. He is the author of Breathing Space, Simpler Living, Dial it Down, and Everyday Project Management. Visit www.BreathingSpace.com for more information on Jeff's keynote speeches and seminars, including: Managing the Pace with Grace® * Achieving Work-Life Balance™ * Managing Information and Communication Overload®



  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
 
 
 

Join the conversation!

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, profanity, vulgarity, doxing, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain fruitful conversation.



Faith

Unleash the Spirit Within

It doesn’t take considerable effort to engage in spiritual-type behavior that will benefit everyone

Published

on

You can practice being more spiritual in little ways that add up quickly to your being a more spiritual person. For example, there are relatively minor things you can do to start the process, although nothing is minor when it comes to acting spiritually. As an example, if you smile at someone, they tend to smile back. If you go out of your way to help someone, that person might in turn help another and so on.

Spirituality certainly does not have to be restricted to the confines of organized religion. Freed from the rules, restrictions, and impediments that organized religion may impose upon you, how and where might you be more spiritual in your life?

Each little action sets in motion the potential for greater good. So, as you proceed through six items below, do not discount the value of engaging in any of these. Each has the potential to add up to more.

Spirituality While Driving

Researchers report that when people get in their cars, they think they’re in some type of invisible vehicle. No one sees them as they motor down the road. If you curse or scream, who’s to know? Obviously, you’re not invisible and the way you conduct yourself as a motorist potentially impacts other motorists, as well as pedestrians.

The next time someone cuts you off in traffic, fails to use their turn signal properly or otherwise engages in improper driving, practice maintaining your composure.

Don’t curse, scream, or honk your horn. If the other person is in view, look at them blankly, but not with disgust or anger, or a mocking smile.

Often, the other party knows what they did wrong. If not, venting your spleen is not likely to change their behavior.

If you travel frequently, say as part of your job, and often traverse high traffic arteries, chances are you’ll have an opportunity at least several times a week to practice engaging in small displays of spirituality. As a goal, why not establish for yourself one composed response per week?

Each time you can remain composed, you increase the probability that you will be more composed in other aspects of your life. Perhaps you’ll even be kinder to people in face-to-face encounters when they commit a transgression.

Comfort the Less Fortunate

As a small gesture of spirituality, what can you do for someone you see right on the street? It’s one thing to write a check to charity; it’s another to encounter someone who is in need and aid that person on the spot.

When you have shoes that you no longer wear, but are not necessarily in pieces, keep them in your trunk as you motor around town. Then, if you see a homeless person with less than sufficient footwear, and it looks like you might be roughly the same size, pull over.

Promptly get the shoes from your trunk, walk up to the person and say that you want them to accept the shoes. If he or she accepts, fine, bid them good day, and be on your way. If he or she chooses not to take them, that’s okay too.

Your goal in this area could be to give away each pair of shoes or other worthwhile item of clothing that you no longer want, perhaps on a monthly basis.

Participate in Group Action

If this is not for you, volunteer once a month to serve a meal at a local shelter for the homeless. If you’re a busy career type, perhaps serving dinner will work best for you. Whatever your preconceived notions about this may be, once you actually serve dinner to real live people, you’ll see that reality is different than you thought.

Perhaps you think that people would be reluctant to speak up for what they wanted. Or worse, they’d be groveling, and you would have to do your best to remain humble. Perhaps you feel like you’ll seem to be some kind of “goody-two-shoes,” dispensing dinners with an overly pleasant, “And how are you this evening? Here’s a nice dinner for you.”

Actually, none of the above usually happens. Person to person, you simply serve another, as if you were in partnership. More peas? Fewer carrots? It’s much more matter-of-fact than you might imagine. They’re appreciative but not groveling.

Note: Some people who show up at a shelter are well dressed. Perhaps they’re temporarily unemployed, or they had a financial emergency they were unprepared to handle.

The more often you serve others in this way, the easier it becomes to do it again. You start to get the notion that there are a lot more similarities between human beings than differences. The old axiom, “There but for the grace of God, go I,” is much more true than we all often acknowledge.

Look for the Good in Others

Is there a co-worker with whom you have had a nasty relationship? Is there something good about this co-worker that you can draw upon, so that you can get yourself to  say something nice to him/her at your next encounter?

Will Rogers, a political satirist, entertainer, and beloved figure in the first half of the twentieth century allegedly said, “I never met a man I didn’t like.” Many people have interpreted Will Rogers to have meant that he could find something admirable in everyone he met. So, too, can we all.

Is there a neighbor with whom you have had a continuing squabble? What would it do to your relationship if you sent your neighbor a card or a brief note that said something along the lines of, “I noticed how lovely your garden was the other day, and wanted to let you know that I appreciate the work you’ve done in maintaining it.”? Too syrupy, or, pardon the expression, too flowery? Guess again.

List five people at work or elsewhere in your life with whom you may not have a good relationship, but whom you can acknowledge. Next to each person’s name, write a dash and then what is good about them.

You’re going to be on Earth for a finite amount of time. Do you want to go through your life trading hostilities with people, never having the where-with-all to restore some semblance of civility to the relationship?

Listen More Closely

Human beings have a profound need to be heard. When you give others your full and complete attention, in essence, you’re telling them that you value them as a people. All activity and concerns in your life stop as the words and emotions of another person take on paramount importance.

Listening is one of people’s most underrated skills. Your ability to listen to another person, giving him or her your full and undivided attention, can be an act of spirituality, particularly if the other person needs someone to listen to him/her. In this rush-rush world, too often we want people to summarize everything they say.

Consider the people in your life who have mattered the most to you and, chances are, they were the people that listened to you best. Whether it was your parents, a brother or sister, a good friend, a relative, a teacher, a coach, a coworker, a mentor, or just somebody down the street, you tend to value those who value you by listening.

In Siddhartha, by Herman Hesse, the young Siddhartha speaks about his most well-developed skills. He can listen, he can fast, and he can wait.

These talents don’t seem like much to the Western mind, but they’re handy if you want to increase the spirituality of your life. As a goal, why not to listen in earnest to one person per week in the workplace whom you would not have otherwise given such time and attention?

At home, give your significant other one good listening to per day, and I promise things will go better. Do the same with each child.

Judge Deeds, Not People

Judgment is a necessary and practical skill. It’s likely that you judge things, including others, all day long. After all, if you want to choose the colleges appropriate for you, friends that share similar values, and the professional, social, and civic groups that you will enjoy being a part of, you need to make some judgments.

We all judge one another, however, sometimes harshly. Everyone can learn from each other. It is so easy to fall into that game, as psychologist Carl Rogers articulated, of “mine is better than yours.” It is too convenient to conclude that people who walk, talk, or look differently than we do, must be vastly different, and by extension, inferior.

As you might have already concluded, it doesn’t take considerable effort to be spiritual and to engage in spiritual-type behavior that will benefit yourself, and benefit others. The opportunities are all around each of us, every day. All we have to do is be aware.

– – – – –

 

Continue Reading

Family

Breathing Space for Autumn

As the trees let go of their leaves, let go of what no longer applies

Published

on

As summer gives way to autumn, use the season to enhance your breathing space. Clear the dead wood. As the trees let go of their leaves, why not let go of what no longer applies or can be given away?

Go through your kitchen cabinets, get all canned goods you don’t want or need, and donate them to your local food bank or homeless shelter. See if you can eliminate four things from your to-do list each week. Schedule at least an hour of uninterrupted time for yourself each day.

Put aside some of your earnings this month as an investment or for a vacation. Better yet, deposit your money into an interest-bearing account and don’t look at it or touch it again until at least the end of the year.

Act Now!

Before it gets too cold, spend a Saturday morning cleaning all of your windows with vinegar and water. You’ll be amazed at the dimness you’ve accepted as light for so long. Set up your own home recycling center so you can conveniently stash newspapers, cans, bottles, and so forth. Knowing you’re helping the environment can give you a sense of breathing space.

Daylight savings time ends in eight weeks, so take advantage of fall evenings. Attend a free lecture some evening about a topic that is outside of your professional interests. Instead of listening to the radio or stereo, buy a self-help, motivational, or fiction tape. Libraries loan books on tape, too. Do this monthly.

Last, take one last swim in a nearby outdoor pool or lake. And take your children apple picking one autumn afternoon!

– – – – –

 

Continue Reading

 

Our Newsletter

Become a Politicrossing insider: Sign up for our free email newsletter, and we'll make sure to keep you in the loop.

Sites We Like

Our Newsletter

Become a PolitiCrossing insider: Sign up for our free email newsletter, and we'll make sure to keep you in the loop.

Trending