Our Border Crisis is About Power, Not Compassion ⋆ Politicrossing
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Our Border Crisis is About Power, Not Compassion

Photo credit: Phil Botha

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NOW, we have real border crisis on our hands.

Tens of thousands of illegal aliens, euphemistically known as “undocumented workers” have overrun our southern border—again. Undocumented workers, dreamers, asylum seekers—whatever one party calls them, it’s all just wordplay. It’s not about compassion or freedom or the American Dream. Rhetoric aside, it’s about marketing and a massive electorate infusion—camouflaged in compassion.

The truth is that most of us are here because our ancestors dreamed of a better life in America. Many of us are immigrants. We’re all Americans. I’m the grandson of an immigrant. My grandfather came here legally and jumped through all the hoops to become a citizen. He was a dreamer.

Trending on PolitiCrossing.com: Tucker: Because of Joe Biden, it’s that simple

What is an illegal alien? He or she is a person in a temporary state that describes the legality of his or her status in a sovereign nation; it has nothing to with their humanity. It’s about someone doing something illegal—like illegally breaching a border—it’s not about their being less human. The dehumanizing argument the party in power uses is a political construct. It’s designed to vilify those who believe in rule of law, sovereignty and the constitutionality of borders.

Legal, precise and meaningful labels like illegal alien do not strip anyone of their humanity or God-created image. If you disagree and feel that they do, I’m not surprised. For years, we’ve been pelted with politically driven partisan constructs like this one through education, social and other media, Machiavellian politicians and a subjective spirit of the age.

Rule of Law

Is it right for a father to break the law by breaching an enforced border, so he can work to give his children a better life? Good fathers would do virtually anything to improve their kids’ life chances. Should they break the law to do so?

We applaud fatherly love and devotion, but flaunting of the rule of law does not provide a good example for one’s children. A father who respects the rule of law provides an essential character building example for his kids and this example would go much further in improving their life chances than just getting into a country by hook or crook.

As a compassionate and sovereign nation, we should offer this advice to parents seeking to improve their children’s futures: If they can’t find suitable work to provide for their families in their country, they can seek employment in ours, but they must do it lawfully.

Consider this hypothetical:

You live in a southern border town. People who chose to run the gauntlet show up on your porch. They’re tired, thirsty and frightened. What do you do? You give them water—just as I would and just as the neighboring pro-border wall ranchers would and just as border patrol agents would.

Doing the Right Thing

Are you breaking the law? It’s not illegal to give people water. However, if you were maintaining water stations and, by doing so, helping people break the law and attracting more people to break the law, would this be wrong? As a reminder, the people you’re helping hydrate are choosing to break the law. A lack of opportunity in their countries does not justify a decision to break laws. Aren’t we all accountable for our decisions?

Now consider this example:

You live in France in 1943. You’re working and living on a farm. In the dead of night, a family of Jews appears on your doorstep. They’re haggard, cold, tired, hungry, scared out of their minds, and half a day ahead of the Gestapo. Your puppet Vichy government has decreed it unlawful to help fleeing Jews. What do you do? You do just what I hope I would do—you give them food, water and shelter and a hiding place.

Or do you give in to fear and close the door? Why put your life in danger? You do so because your government’s law violates God’s laws. You help them out of love, compassion and obedience to Almighty God and in defiance of your weakling government that’s doing the will of its evil client regime.

Big Differences

Let’s review some key differences in these scenarios:

A) One describes a violation of God’s laws.
B) One includes people forced to flee and break the law. They have no choice. They’re not looking for work, they’re looking to stay alive.
C) The American government is not a puppet Vichy government enforcing evil immigration laws.

Speaking of governments, does enforcing federal law depend on compassion and empathy? Do you think Joe Biden or Nancy Pelosi know real hardship? Just because they seem to care about people doesn’t mean they can empathize with them. In the case of illegal immigration, is their flaunting of federal law powered by real compassion and or an opportunity to create hordes of new voters?

Meanwhile, they vilify opponents, slander them and insult our intelligence by telling us they’re the only ones who care because they’re willing to ignore federal law in order to help people break our laws.

God and Borders

To those who think sovereign nations have no business securing their borders and like to say that God is on their side; here are a few questions to ponder and a counter argument to consider:

What if God recognizes nations and their sovereignty and rule of law regarding immigration? After all, the concepts of national sovereignty and natural-born citizenship originated from God regarding his people. If this is true, there’s a sanctity to the rule of law. And if all legitimate laws come from God and are instituted by him, as Paul says in Romans 13, all are called to obey the laws of the land—unless they conflict with God’s laws.

Whether or not you accept these as truths, here’s my challenge: Convince me that our federal immigration laws conflict with God’s, and I’ll storm the Bastille with you. I’ll resist any law that prohibits people from entering our country. Let’s put rubber to road: Where does God stand on refugees and widows and orphans fleeing intolerable living conditions?

I think we can agree that he stands above and beyond petty politics and weaponized partisan constructs. That said, God wants us to extend help and compassion toward refugees, travelers and the poor and widows. God is right there with us in our compassion and love toward others. He also wants us to obey laws and those in authority over us—unless either or both breaks his laws.

It’s my view that the party in power is doing just that, but that our federal immigration laws are right and proper and consistent with good governance and policy. If those in the party in power disagree, they should change them through legislation, not ignore them. That’s what banana republics do.

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Patrick grew up in Texas and graduated from the University of North Texas with a master’s degree in journalism and advertising. His undergraduate degree is in English and photography. He served six years in the U.S. Navy where his life was changed forever by the Lord Jesus Christ. He lives in the Sierra Nevada of Northern California with his wife, dog and two cats. He enjoys hiking and cycling, taking pictures, writing and blogging at https://luscri.com/



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Faith

Seek Out the Good in Others

If you try, you can find at least one thing admirable in everyone you meet.

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Will Rogers, a political satirist, entertainer, and beloved figure in the first half of the twentieth century allegedly said, “I never met a man I didn’t like.” Many people have interpreted Will Rogers to have meant that he could find something admirable in everyone he met. So, too, can we all.

Something Admirable

Is there a co-worker with whom you have had a nasty relationship? Is there something good about this co-worker that you can draw upon, so that you can actually say something nice to him/her at your next encounter?

Is there a neighbor with whom you have had a continuing squabble? What would it do to your relationship if you sent your neighbor a card or a brief note that said something along the lines of, “I noticed how lovely your garden was the other day and wanted to let you know that I appreciate the work you’ve done in maintaining it.” Too syrupy, or, pardon the expression, too flowery?  Guess again.

Trending on PolitiCrossing.com: Tucker: Because of Joe Biden, it’s that simple

You’re on this planet for finite amount of time. Do you want to go through your life trading hostilities with people, never having the where-with-all to restore some semblance of civility to the relationship?

Finding the Good

Try thinking of and listing five people who you may not have a good relationship with but can acknowledge. Next to each person’s name, write what is good about them. Do they maintain a nice garden? Here are some ideas for you in case you’re drawing a blank. This person…

* Is kind to the receptionist at work.
* Turns assignments in on time, and hence, supports the team.
* Walks softly past your office, so as not to disturb you.
* Greets you in the morning when you arrive.
* Maintains his or her office well.

Away from work, here are some ideas for finding the good in others:
* Keeps the street in front of the yard free of debris.
* Is respectful of others’ needs for quiet.
* Dresses well.
* Has well-behaved children.
* Drives safely in the neighborhood.

If you try, you’ll find something good!

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Faith

Reducing Stress Through Prayer, and More

Taking a few minutes out of a hectic day can spell the difference between frenzy and tranquility

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Prayer has been an effective method for soothing the soul since people first believed in God. For some people, the payoff comes with sitting still, and being quiet. Many feel a direct connection with God which, in itself, is calming. Those who attend a place of worship every Sunday find that praying with others is comforting. Reverence to God, fellowship, and familiar chants and hymns can all aid in reducing stress and bringing inner contentment.

If you haven’t prayed in a while, in addition to the religious aspects, the stress reduction can be magnificent. Even if you never attend a formal prayer service, informal prayer, by your bedside, in a comfortable chair, or somewhere in nature can work as well. Some of the most accomplished and admirable people who have ever walked this earth have been deeply religious and have found great comfort in prayer.

Other Options

In our rush-rush society, your ability to take a few minutes out of a hectic day can spell the difference between frenzy and tranquility. The majority of stress we experience is a result of the daily deluge of information and communication we come in contact with on top of the amount of tasks we need to accomplish. If you have been experiencing severe stress, it might mean the difference between a long life and a shortened one.

Trending on PolitiCrossing.com: Tucker: Because of Joe Biden, it’s that simple

People have long used drugs (prescribed and otherwise!) and medications to achieve certain effects. I’m not knocking all of these substances – some of them probably live up to their mystique; however, there is no need to engage in drugs, considering there are so many other ways to effectively reduce stress.

Amidst the flurry of reports from medical researchers, many people also rely on a glass or two of wine each day to relax. If this is your habit, and it works for you, you’re probably on reasonably safe ground. The latest research, however, paints a less rosy picture about wine’s beneficial effects. I’m concerned, as well, about the long-term effects of having two glasses of wine, 365 days a year, for 10 or 20 years.

Change for Real

It often seems like people around you are enamored by some techniques such as meditation or yoga, but in reality, most people who practice these or other techniques do so only a handful of times. Then, they revert back to what they did previously.

The changes that you implement need to come without too much pain, to be subtle, even natural and easy. Otherwise, you probably won’t stick with them. Lasting and effective change can come from small incremental change. So, keep in mind that not every technique will strike your fancy. Enough of them will fit your lifestyle, and will work for you enough of the time for you to stay with them and to ultimately exercise control in ways that you have always wanted.

Talking to Someone

The mere act of talking to someone about issues confronting you can be stress reducing, and certainly more effective than mentally stewing over things alone. In The Psychological Society, author Martin L. Gross concluded that “the modern industry of psychology in America was no more effective in treating patients than witch doctors in Africa were in treating people who came to them.”

The key was whether or not the patient believed that the doctor had healing powers. Hence, if you believe that a witch doctor can help you, then a witch doctor can be as effective as a psychiatrist. A trusted friend or relative, with whom you can discuss your problems, can be equally effective.

The idea of talking to someone about what is stressing you is not so much that you will find a solution then and there, but that the mere physical act of discussing the stressor moves you closer to resolution, perhaps using one of the techniques discussed in this article.

Using Humor

Throughout the ages, humor has also been a primary tool in helping to reduce stress. Don’t discount the power of humor before trying it. If it’s been a while, or forever, since you’ve engaged in humor to reduce stress, you’re in for a treat. I’m not talking about jokes or side-splitting belly laughs, but rather a gleeful, playful acceptance of the inane and absurd situations that you encounter, and as a business owner you have your share of them.

The ability to laugh at yourself or to laugh at your situation might spell the fundamental difference between those who show resilience in the face of hard times, and those who face nervous breakdowns.

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