Maintaining Perspective in Turbulent Times - Politicrossing
Connect with us

Life

Maintaining Perspective in Turbulent Times

Face your obstacles head on; you are more resourceful than you currently presume

Published

on

From an array of insane Leftist activities designed to destroy the nation, to the lingering coronavirus, to lockdowns, to umpteen Biden administration blunders, these are times that try people’s souls!

Upon an unexpected setback at work or in life, some people fall into a “justice trap.” They think that somehow, some way a cosmic sense of justice will prevail. Yet, consider the 12 million people who starved in Ukraine in the 1930s, under Josef Stalin of the USSR. Is that cosmic justice?

Babies who die one day after birth experience no cosmic justice. Justice, like fairness, is an ideal. In the endeavors of humankind, fairness is certainly worth seeking, but, like justice, it is largely illusory.

Trending on PolitiCrossing.com: Choosing to Trust Yourself

Disruption Happens

Events of varying magnitudes can disrupt one’s sense of homeostasis. Disruption and reintegration occur often, even simultaneously. Yet for each of us, notable increases in our level of resilience can occur in mere moments, or over the course of several years, depending on what we experience and how we process it.

Perhaps the quintessential example of the resilient individual is none other than the 16th president of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. Lincoln was defeated in his bid for Congress on many occasions. Even as late as 1858, two years before he won the presidential election, Lincoln lost his bid to become a senator from Illinois:

1831 – Failed in business
1832 – Defeated for legislature
1833 – Again failed in business
1834 – Elected to legislature
1835 – Sweetheart died
1836 – Had a nervous breakdown
1838 – Defeated for speaker
1840 – Defeated for elector
1843 – Defeated for Congress
1846 – Elected for Congress
1848 – Defeated for Congress
1854 – Defeated for Senate
1856 – Defeated for Vice-President
1858 – Defeated for Senate

Following all of the setbacks written above, in 1860, Abraham Lincoln was elected as the 16th president of the United States.

A Benchmark for the Ages

Anyone studying Lincoln’s life could draw the conclusion that until 1860, when he was 49, he was largely a failure. Did he let election defeat after election defeat subdue his willingness to serve? Apparently, not at all. The resilience he exhibited during his decades-long quest to to serve in public office was rewarded when he was elected  president.

Once in office, Lincoln’s resilience became the benchmark of his tenure, during perhaps the most harrowing time in our nation’s history. The Civil War, in which a divided America slaughtered itself by the tens of thousands, is unprecedented in our history.

All other mass casualties from wars or attacks on Americans came at the hands of external enemies. Only Lincoln, amidst all other presidents, governed during a time in which Americans fought Americans; in some cases, literally brother against brother.

Fail Forward

Undoubtedly, Lincoln had one harrowing experience after another, as he lost the runs for U.S. Congress and for the Senate repeatedly. Somehow, as he processed his experiences, he managed to “fail forward,” drawing upon the reflections and lessons that he gained. Indeed, many successful people in history experienced career setbacks before ultimately achieving their greatest triumphs.

Drawing upon his inner strength, his lessons from childhood, his marvelous, self-initiated version of home-schooling, the philosophy and resilience he had developed over the years, and his legal education, he was able to maintain perspective and equanimity, over a four-year period, that would have broken other men.

Albert Einstein, for example, worked as a lowly clerk in the Swiss Patent Office when he developed his Theory of Relativity. Thomas Edison made 8000+ unsuccessful attempts to find the proper filament for his lightbulb. Babe Ruth struck out more times than anyone on his way to hitting more home runs than anyone.

So, face your obstacles head on, and realize that you are more resourceful than you currently presume.

– – – – –

 

We'd love to hear your thoughts about this article. Please take a minute to share them in the comment section by clicking here. Or carry the conversation over on your favorite social network by clicking one of the share buttons below.


Jeff Davidson is the world's only holder of the title "The Work-Life Balance Expert®" as awarded by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. He is the premier thought leader on work-life balance, integration, and harmony. Jeff speaks to organizations that seek to enhance their overall productivity by improving the effectiveness of their people. He is the author of Breathing Space, Simpler Living, Dial it Down, and Everyday Project Management. Visit www.BreathingSpace.com for more information on Jeff's keynote speeches and seminars, including: Managing the Pace with Grace® * Achieving Work-Life Balance™ * Managing Information and Communication Overload®



  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
 
 
 

Join the conversation!

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, profanity, vulgarity, doxing, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain fruitful conversation.



Life

How the Rest was Won

Are you consistently getting the rest that you need so that you can keep your well-oiled machine operating at peak efficiency?

Published

on

The last 14 months have presented a supreme economic challenge to many people, especially to business owners but certainly to career achievers as well.

Suppose you are a diligent worker, and everybody knows that. As normal schedules resume, you arrive on time, consistently offer your best effort, dawdle very little, often work late, and head home knowing that you gave it your all. Once you arrive home you have other responsibilities, some taking up half or more of the evening.

Here is a basic question: Are you consistently getting needed rest so that you can keep your well-oiled machine operating at peak efficiency? In other words do you:

Trending on PolitiCrossing.com: Choosing to Trust Yourself

• Take pauses throughout the workday to rest and reflect,

• Depart each day at a reasonable hour (at least most days),

• Get a good night’s sleep every night, and

• Have some form of relaxation on Saturday and Sunday?

If you answered no to any of the questions above, it’s probably an area where you need to focus.

Fatigue isn’t Pretty

In the course of a career, as you rise through the ranks, or simply take on more responsibility right where you are, like everyone else in the global workforce, understandably you are subject to fatigue.

You simply cannot be at your best, hour after hour, day after day, and week after week if you don’t take care of yourself, especially focusing on rest and relaxation.

Everything written above has been apparent to you for years if not decades. How often do you pay heed to your internal wisdom, however, about when and where you need to have some timeouts?

If you graduated from college at 21 or 22 and work until age 71 or 72, that is a 50-year career. Who among us can work for 50 years and not expect to have some disruptions along the way? We need to take periodic breaks to attain the periodic rest that we need.

For example, in the course of the workweek, how many times do you give yourself permission to retire to bed early at, say, 8:30-9 p.m.? How many times, in the course of the workweek, do you have a truly leisurely non-hurried lunch where you get to properly chew and digest your food?

A Moment Like This

How many times do you take one minute, the full 60 seconds, to pause what you’re currently doing, stretch, gaze out the window, ruminate and reflect, and then turn back to the task at hand? If you’re like too many professionals today, across the board, I’m guessing that your answers to the questions above are “not often enough.”

You know by now that no one else is coming to help you deal with your personal need for rest and relaxation. Attaining such rest is a do-it-to-yourself proposition. Either you will take charge of the issue, or the issue will take charge of you.

To paraphrase the renown poet, Robert Frost, you’ve got miles to go, and promises to keep. Others are counting on you. Most of all, you need to be able to count on yourself – to be present, to handle the tough challenges, to come back and do it again, and to stay buoyant all the while.

Fortunately, you have what you need to maintain that well-oiled machine, and now, it’s simply a matter of putting what you know into practice.

– – – – –

 

Continue Reading

Life

Choosing to Trust Yourself

Every other day, we’re given contradictory, ‘authoritative,’ new advice on social distancing, masks, what’s safe, and what isn’t.

Published

on

Every other day, it seems we are given new ‘authoritative’ advice on social distancing, masks, what’s safe, and what isn’t. Much of the news to which we’re exposed contradicts what we were already told.

The CDC and some top officials, who shall remain nameless, have done less than a stellar job of providing reliable public information. Some governors in large population states, have been inconsistent, partial, duplicitous, authoritarian, and, in some cases, criminal.

Who Can I turn To?

Against such a backdrop, how does John and Jane Q. Citizen move forward professionally and personally? This is not foolproof but works as well as anything we’ve seen: Trust yourself and your decisions.

Trusting yourself enhances your ability to choose based on limited or inconsistent information. A study in the 1940s of highly successful people uniformly found that they reached decisions quickly and retreated from them slowly.

A more recent study found when people make decisions based on instinct, they are happier or at least more content than those who make decisions based on careful analysis. Hmm. Too much thinking could be hazardous to your choices – and to your happiness!

Reinforcing Statements

Here is the statement that reinforces your desire to trust yourself: “I choose to trust my ability to make the right choice.” Another essential choice is choosing to feel worthy and complete, simply spoken to yourself: “I choose to feel worthy and complete.” This helps me reduce anxiety, stay calm, and feel more relaxed.

Depending on how long it has been since you’ve felt worthy and complete, you might have to make this choice for many days or weeks running – but keep at it.

By choosing to feel worthy and complete, you automatically redirect yourself to accept that there is nothing you must do. Everything is based on your choice.

If you choose to continue working on some task, even one assigned to you, the choice is made in the present moment, and not based on a prior agenda. A worthy and complete feeling yields a tremendous sense of inner harmony.

Maintaining Your Choices

As with any quest to reinforce choices you make, write or type your choices and post them, or voice record them and play them back. How many choices can you make at once? Make a few or many, there is no limit.

Choose what feels right for you. And keep choosing. While you’re waiting in a bank line, run through your choices. If you notice yourself wavering, recall the new behavior or feeling that you’ve chosen.

You can choose to overcome rituals that no longer support you, or you can make choices beyond anything others would have guessed you’d choose.

A new idea is such a rare thing. We often simply parrot what we hear and read. You can make choices that are not congruent with your history. You can makes choices that no one has ever made before.

– – – – –

 

 

Continue Reading

Our Newsletter

Become a Politicrossing insider: Sign up for our free email newsletter, and we'll make sure to keep you in the loop.

Sites We Like

Our Newsletter

Become a PolitiCrossing insider: Sign up for our free email newsletter, and we'll make sure to keep you in the loop.

Trending

Politicrossing
 
Send this to a friend