Hollywood Degrades Society and Exports Filth About America - Politicrossing
Connect with us

Family

Hollywood Degrades Society and Exports Filth About America

Moviemakers increasingly debase our society via storylines, profanity, and numerous ploys.

Published

on

Normally, the Oscar Awards show would be scheduled for the next week or so, but this year it is delayed until April 25. Last September, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences issued a new set of standards for the Academy Awards’s best picture category. Starting in 2022, films that under-represent racial minorities, women, LGBTQ individuals, and people with disabilities in both cast and crew will not be nominated. So watch for Viola Davis to portray Queen Victoria, and for Denzel Washington to star as Teddy Roosevelt, any day now.

Even before the ‘social justice’ edict which the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences levied on the film makers, the movie industry was in a state of flux with new releases delayed, theaters abandoned, and streaming services sharply rising in popularity. One year earlier, the industry was on a roll. When visiting RottenTomatoes, you couldn’t ignore the number of movies rated 80% or higher.

An insidious trend, nonetheless, has continued for decades: Hollywood increasingly degrades society via storylines, profanity, and a multitude of devices. Then it exports its filthy vision of America around the world. Reviewing the last several years, 2017 appears as a turning point. During that year, in the films released, which had been in production in 2015 and 2016, use of foul language in scripts noticeably accelerated, as if screen writers had made a pact with one another.

That’s Entertainment?

In I, Tonya, one might expect to occasionally hear the f-word, but 120 times — more often than once every 60 seconds? In a scene from the acclaimed Lady Bird, the mother rants at her family seated at the dinner table, “Make your own f___ dinner.” Gratuitous, egregious, and offensive behavior, masquerading as entertainment? What parent, who sends her daughter to Catholic school, acts in this manner?

In Three Billboards Outside of Ebbing, Missouri, the level of profanity is over the top. Every 10th word out of Frances McDormand’s mouth, and out of the mouths of the townspeople, is f___ this, and f___ that. Early on, Woody Harrelson, as the police chief, during his Easter dinner with his wife and his two young children greets a caller, with, “You god__mn ass__e.” He then winks at his children and says, “Sorry girls,” as if such terms are permissible in that setting as some kind of an inside joke.

The website KidsInMind.com counts about 84 f-words and its derivatives in Three Billboards. The sordid language in this 115 minute movie also contains scatological terms, 23 milder obscenities, 15 “anatomical” references, 7 disparaging remarks concerning African-Americans, 4 explicit sexual references, 2 disturbing terms for homosexuals, 2 disrespectful terms for Hispanic people, and 1 demeaning term for small people.

All this amidst name-calling such as dummy, idiots, retards, stupid, dumb, crazy old ladies, fat boy, fat little Mexican boy, wife beaters, lazy, scumbags; provocative language, on average, every 40 seconds. Okay, it’s a dark comedy, we get it. Each of us has the option to skip seeing the movie, but many actors, critics, and film societies chose it as the best picture of the year.

Inept, Unimaginative Writing

In The Florida Project, a story about children of single mothers, living in the throes of Disney World, guess what one hears throughout the whole movie? In the acclaimed thriller, Get Out, it’s more of the same. In dozens of the top movies, the f-word predominates. It’s standard fare in Good Night and Landline, and is lightly sprinkled throughout Molly’s Game and All the Money in the World.

Are screen writers inept and unable to derive cleverer ways to express characters’ emotions? Over-employing the f-word reveals language deficiency. The writer does not have a sufficiently broad vocabulary to intelligently express a character’s emotions.

Is dropping in the f-word frequently “keeping it real?” Today, when few people read history or historical novels, many derive what they ‘know’ from the cinema. Perhaps worse, cultures around the world, who gobble up what Hollywood has to offer, gain parallaxed views of the U.S.

James Cagney, Humphrey Bogart, and, more recently, Clint Eastwood played tough guys, often in dire situations, and (due to industry codes) never uttered the f-word once. The same for females playing ‘tough’ roles, such as Barbara Stanwyck,  Lana Turner, and Betty Davis. We recall these actors in their classic roles. Who today can match them?

Impressionable Viewers

Hollywood is gripping our culture by the throat, and it’s intentional: A 50+ year assault, since the anti-heros of the late 1960s, and getting worse. Dropping the f-bomb is an easy and calculated way for writers, directors, and producers to degrade society. They ought to know better and they ought to do better.

Jeff Davidson is "The Work-Life Balance Expert®" and the premier thought leader on work-life balance, integration, and harmony. Jeff speaks to organizations that seek to enhance their overall productivity by improving the effectiveness of their people. Visit www.BreathingSpace.com



  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Join the conversation!

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, profanity, vulgarity, doxing, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain fruitful conversation.



Faith

How To Live The Best Christian Life

Published

on

What does it mean to live well in this world? For many, they root the worldly answer to this question in vanity and materialism. Fortunately, the authority of God’s word has an answer for us. Society and sometimes our own ego’s tell us how important it is to be successful. Our modern world usually defines success as earning more money, getting a big house, a nice car, a boat, maybe even an airplane. Success could mean climbing the promotion ladder at your job, or having a very successful business. For many, they define success in how many “followers” or “likes” they have on their social media platform. Yet, as people gain these successes, many of them are searching still for more happiness and meaning.

Americans of all economic backgrounds are left with a void. According to a Time Magazine story, suicide rates are higher than at any other time since World War I. A Harvard report informs us of an “Astounding increase in antidepressant use by Americans.” This type of sad news informs us that even as citizens of the richest nation in the world, more cars, boats, bigger houses, career advances, etc…. are not enough to make us happy. So what can people do to discover fulfillment and success independent of the material? Luckily, God’s word provides us with the answer. The wonderful youtube channel, The Bible Project, does an excellent job of providing succinct overviews of each book of the Bible. Their take on Ecclesiastes is an instructive guide to aid us in how to live the best Christian life.

The Book of Ecclesiastes explains three observations about our world. The first is father time:

Generations come, and generations go,
but the earth remains forever.
The sun rises and the sun sets,
and hurries back to where it rises.
The wind blows to the south
and turns to the north;
round and round it goes,
ever returning on its course…
No one remembers the former generations,
and even those yet to come
will not be remembered
by those who follow them. – Ecclesiastes 1 ( 4-6, 11) (NIV)

In the grand expanse of the universe, we are just a speck. Everything that is so important to us right now: our careers, our bank accounts, our cars, our “successes” mean nothing in the big picture of God’s eternal plan. Our earthly existence is just a quick flash. A small drop in an enormous ocean of time.

The second observation form Ecclesiastes is that we will all die and return to dust and that our concerns while here on earth are relatively meaningless.
Surely the fate of human beings is like that of the animals; the same fate awaits them both: As one dies, so dies the other. All have the same breath; humans have no advantage over animals. Everything is meaningless. All go to the same place; all come from dust, and to dust all return. -Ecclesiastes (19-21) (NIV)

The third observation we learn from Ecclesiastes is that life is random. :

The race is not to the swift
or the battle to the strong,
nor does food come to the wise
or wealth to the brilliant
or favor to the learned;
but time and chance happen to them all.
Moreover, no one knows when their hour will come. Ecclesiastes 9, 11-12 (NIV)

The lesson here is that life is way too complex for us to try and control and attempting to do so sets us up for failure and disappointment. These three observations can make life seem pretty dark and pointless. The author explains that everything in life is hevel. This is a Hebrew word meaning vapor or smoke. And like smoke, life can look like one thing, but quickly change into another form. You can reach out and try to grab (control) both smoke and life to no avail.

Modern biblical translations miss the smoke metaphor and usually translate hevel to the word meaningless. However, the author of Ecclesiastes isn’t suggesting that life has no meaning, but that instead, life can be unclear (like smoke). Just like standing in a smoky room, life can be confusing, stressful, and it’s difficult to know what lies in front of you. Therefore, while it may not always guarantee short-term success in our time on earth, we should live in fear of the Lord and have faith because his plan is eternal and beyond our comprehension.

The lesson of Ecclesiastes is that since we have no control in life, we should focus on the one thing that we do have control over, our attitude. Real success is accepting this lack of control and appreciating not the material, but the intangible things in life: holding hands with a loved one, sitting out in the sun on a warm day, your bare feet on the beach, a great meal with friends and loved ones. We should learn to enjoy these good simple moments, and the bad, because while they are fleeting, they are all gifts from a loving God.

The good times and the bad, the money, the jobs, our health, our friends, and even our loved one’s will all come and go. If we can teach ourselves to appreciate the ups and the downs of this rollercoaster of life and understand that God is the master of the entire amusement park, then learning to enjoy the ride is the accurate definition of success. This is how we can learn to live our best Christian life.

Continue Reading

Family

The Less You Owe, the More You Live

Can a nation, or a person, run up huge deficits and expect no financial and economic consequences?

Published

on

Conservative Business Ecosystem

Society conditions us to consume more than we need and to spend more than we make. However, this kind of lifestyle is a recipe for disaster. Taking back control of your finances can help you free up time and make you feel more in control of your life.

Think back to your high school and college history classes: can you recall a nation in the history of the earth that accumulated huge deficits over a prolonged period of time, lacked a concerted effort towards reducing these deficits, yet was able to sustain economic prosperity for its citizens?

Can a nation, in debt for trillions annually, or a person – namely you – consistently run up huge deficits and expect no consequences?  For decades, tens of millions of Americans have accumulated personal debt via credit cards, loans, and other forms of financing. It’s likely that you have some financial debts.

Subtle Servitude

Sustained deficit spending eventually erodes your ability to prepare for the future, and worse, to capitalize on current opportunities. The more you owe, the more enslaved you are! In Consumerism, Dr. Judith Schor notes that you’ve likely been taught to consume more than you need.

Right now, how would it feel if all your credit cards were paid off? How would it feel if you paid your monthly rent or mortgage several months in advance? How would it feel if your car loan was paid off? How would it feel if you were actually able to pay some of your utility bills for months in advance? For most people it would feel great. You’d feel in control of your time.

We all know the arguments about losing the (minuscule) amount of interest you could have earned if you let your money sit in the bank instead of paying the electric bill three months in advance. Ah, but wait. A month after you’ve paid your electric bill three months in advance, you receive the next month’s bill. Guess what? It shows that you have a huge credit and that nothing is due – you’ll smile when you see these kinds of bills!

A Moratorium on Spending

To reduce your personal debts, place a moratorium on optional spending, regardless of what items entice you, until your credit cards have zero balances.

Now, please, let’s not confuse issues. There is value in paying others to do that which you don’t like to do. These are separate issues. Paying for something that frees up your time is a life benefit. Paying for material things which you don’t need, and certainly don’t save your time, might be satisfying, but ultimately can be draining.

Here are some useful exercises for controlling your checkbook, and hence reclaiming your life:

1. Write out checks to pay bills in advance of their due dates. Then, keep an advance file with a folder for each day of the month. Place the check in a sealed, addressed, and stamped envelope. Then put the envelope in the folder of the day it’s to be mailed. This way the money is allocated in advance in your checkbook, and your bills are paid on time. If your checking account pays interest, you don’t lose interest.

2. Occasionally, overpay the balance on your continuing accounts, or pay early. This gives you the aforementioned psychological boost when you see a credit on your next statement, and gives you a good reputation with your creditors, which is handy!

3. Keep a stick-on note in your checkbook for an immediate reference that lists what’s coming in this month and what needs to be paid. This provides you with a running mini-cash flow list you can refer to at will. Update it every week, or day, if necessary.

4. Review old checkbooks and see what you paid to whom for what. Do the same thing with your monthly credit card statements. Put a red mark next to all those expenditures that you didn’t need to make, or that you could have done without after further consideration.

5. Now, considering expenditures on the horizon, which ones can you do without?

Spend Less, Save More

As author Roger Dawson says, “It doesn’t matter how much money you’re making; if you’re spending more than you take in each month, you’re headed for trouble.” If you spend less than you take in, eventually your debt will decrease, perhaps even disappear.

 

Continue Reading

Our Newsletter

Become a Politicrossing insider: Sign up for our free email newsletter, and we'll make sure to keep you in the loop.

Our Newsletter

Become a Politicrossing insider: Sign up for our free email newsletter, and we'll make sure to keep you in the loop.

Trending

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!
 
Send this to a friend