Diversity=Disunity. Rediscovering the American Dream is our only hope. ⋆
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Diversity=Disunity. Rediscovering the American Dream is our only hope.

Photo credit: Luke Stackpoole

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We become not a melting pot but a beautiful mosaic. Different people, different beliefs, different yearnings, different hopes, different dreams. ~Jimmy Carter

Let’s talk about the dream that once made our nation strong. This vision has nothing to do with differing anything. Where once our differences were incidental; they’re now monumental. What can we do to overcome our obstacles and achieve real unity? Rediscover our shared American Dream.

The American Dream once beckoned hopeful immigrants to come for the chance to build new lives through opportunity and freedom. If they could only get to our shores, they reasoned, they could work hard to become citizens in a nation that, far from perfect, afforded them the best chance to build new and better lives.

What happened to the American Dream? It’s been lost to the limiting, shaming and militant god of cultural diversity. If my grandfather had arrived in 2021 instead of 1909, he would find a once promising and relatively united country torn and tugged by division and a glorification of all things different.

Building barriers, not bridges

Instead of discovering a diverse nation of fellow immigrants and new citizens united by a shared dream, he’d be encouraged to cling to his cultural heritage and to resist embracing American culture—the very culture his family had scrimped and saved and sacrificed everything to join.

My grandfather would be confronted by his supposed “white privilege” even though he was more olive than white. America’s diversity dealers would demand he accept his white guilt and embrace his tribe. They don’t build bridges; they build barriers by glorifying differences.

Our once shared American Dream has been trampled and trumped by a small, but vocal minority who decry its legitimacy. A dream that galvanized generations of immigrants has been replaced by a glorification of cultural diversity.

There’s nothing wrong with cultural diversity per se—but there’s everything wrong with it when it divides rather than unites us. Diversity, with the right perspective and emphasis, makes us uniquely American.

Diversity as America

What began as a rekindling of interest in our rich ethnic and cultural origins has become an elevation of all things diverse. And by making diversity an obsession, proponents have denigrated the idea of conforming to a shared national identity.

Here’s a fun factoid:

According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the word “diversity” only acquired its present-day ethnic focus as recently as 1992. Since then, diversity means so much more than … well, what it actually means.

Contrary to our leaders in education, politics and the spirit of the age, diversity does not make for a Utopian paradise of differing and self-contained, yet somehow cohesive mini-cultures. Neither does it weave a strong national tapestry or create a beautiful mosaic. What did diversity mean before its meaning was co-opted?

Diversity is rooted in the Latin word, diversitatem (nominative diversitas), which means contrariety, contradiction, or disagreement. Disagreement naturally occurs when people of differing cultures, ethnicities, religions and worldviews focus on their differences. Diversity is a cousin to discord, which is inevitable—just as my words will create discord. Worthwhile diversity is about commitment, not division.

Commitment is constitutional

In America, what unites people with differences is a commitment to a common dream: Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. This is a central tenet of our Constitution, which, by the way, immigrants swear by before they become citizens.

The oath, in part, is this: I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen; that I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America … that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same.

Renounce allegiance … bear true faith? These words confirm a commitment to a uniquely American way of thinking, an embrace of uniquely American values and dreams. The words of the oath are a commitment to … dun dun DUN … assimilation.

Assimilation good, tribalism bad

Sadly, assimilation has been made a dirty word just as “melting pot” has been made a dirty phrase. Here’s the truth—an immigrant cannot truly commit to becoming an American nor fulfill his or her oath without assimilating.

The idea that successful immigration can occur without assimilation is a relatively new construct—and it’s naturally illogical. A foolish, mouthy minority has convinced a generation of young minds that a culture with differing beliefs, yearnings, hopes and dreams makes for a stronger society and nation. This is nonsense.

Here’s more truth: A culture with different people with differing beliefs and points of origin can be strong—but only if its people are united by a common dream. 

Consider the world-changing actions of our “Greatest Generation.” Ask an elderly American what made his or her country great. They certainly don’t cringe at the mention of a melting pot. If they’re honest—and most are—they’ll tell you Jimmy Carter is full of it.

Issue of the heart

This quote by a much more effective president make much more sense: “Citizens by birth or choice, of a common country, that country has a right to concentrate your affections.” ~George Washington

This seems like “nationalism” because it is. Is nationalism also a dirty word? It is now. Somehow, to be a nationalistic nation is to be a racist one—even though our country have been its strongest, wisest and best when we’ve been the most nationalistic. Is it wrong to be a nationalistic superpower? Not when a nation balances its greatness with goodness.

The greatest nations in history were powerful, altruistic and influential in their time. And they were nationalistic … without being Nazi. Take this test: Think about the word nationalism. Does Nazi or Alt Right come to mind? If so, have you been influenced by an ideology?

Conversely, if nationalism makes you think about our nation coming together after Pearl Harbor or 9-11, maybe your mind is still free and historically sensitive and unencumbered by propaganda.

Logic over lunacy

Let’s look at this logically. Allow me to ask some penetrating questions regarding this diversity-as-virtue motif:

When athletes on a sports team hold differing beliefs about how to reach their goal of winning a championship, will they be as likely to become champions? If soldiers in an army have different ideas about how to win a battle and aren’t willing to follow the battle plan, will the army be as effective a fighting force?

When employees of a company don’t conform to a singular business model to achieve profitability, will the company stand the best chance to succeed? If we hold differing beliefs, yearnings, hopes and dreams, can we be strong as a nation?

Never too late

Yes, we can, but only if we lose the hyphen and see ourselves as Americans first and foremost. We desperately need to re-examine this infatuation with elevating and glorifying cultural differences. If you want to appreciate other cultures, please do so, but don’t do it at the expense of a shared American culture.

The opportunity to pursue happiness and the American Dream can be as inviting, accepting and amazing for us and our children and grandchildren as it was for our great-grandparents and their parents.

We’re different, but let’s be different together—as Americans. Let’s resist the diversity despots who create barriers between us by glorifying our differences. By coming together, we can recapture what Americans do best—excel by pursuing a shared dream of freedom, opportunity and goodness through a shared commitment.

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Patrick is a journalist and writer with degrees in English and journalism. He served six years in the Navy where his life was changed forever by the Lord Jesus Christ. He lives in the Sierra Nevada of Northern California with his wife, dog and two cats. He enjoys hiking and cycling, taking pictures and blogging at https://luscri.com/



 
 
 

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Life

21 Ways That People with Work-life Balance Are Different from Others (Part 1)

Take time for rest and reflection throughout the day, and accomplish more as a result

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The typical person thinks that work-life balance is needed only when things get hectic. Not so! Here are the first seven observations and accompanying recommendations for achieving Work-life Balance.

1) The typical person thinks that work-life balance is needed only when things get hectic. Those who have work-life balance realize that it is an everyday practice. So, what can you do?
* practice work-life balance techniques everyday, much like taking a daily shower
* recognize the small opportunities around you all day long
* plan from Sunday night to next Sunday
* maintain a mindset of not loading up on activities and not overdoing it

2) The typical person becomes stressed throughout the workday from mounting demands. Those with work-life balance anticipate unexpected demands and dispense their energy accordingly. So,
* leave sufficient slack in your schedule
* have one weekday evening per week with nothing scheduled
* pace yourself throughout the day
* establish a resource network of key contacts, phone numbers, email, etc.

3) The typical person suspects that only a privileged few can attain work-life balance. Those with work-life balance understand that it is within everyone’s grasp.
* read about work-life balance
* talk about work-life balance
* trade work-life balance ideas
* be on the lookout

4) The typical person assumes that “money buys happiness.” Those who have work-life balance know that money won’t help if you’re on the wrong path.
* consider that simple solutions often work best
* adopt a less is more approach
* pare down
* systemize or eliminate

5) The typical person regards taking time for themselves as a luxury they can’t afford. Those who have work-life balance recognize that taking time for themselves is vital.
* pause for ten one-minute breaks
* go on true lunch breaks
* take strategic pauses
* allow for whole weekends off

6) The typical person thinks that achieving work-life balance will be fleeting; it won’t last long. Those who have work-life balance take a rational, methodical approach to maintaining it.
* recognize that upsets and overwhelm will occur
* ask: what do I want to finish by the end of work today to feel good about the evening?
* ask: what do I want to finish before Friday to feel good about the weekend?
* keep creating a clearing (like Zen masters)

7) The typical person sacrifices rest and reflection in the hope of getting more done. Those with work-life balance take time for rest and reflection throughout the day, and accomplish more as a result.
* sleep eight hours a night
* linger after lunch
* center yourself on the way to the restroom, water cooler, even between tasks
* draw upon self-calming rituals all day long

– – – – –

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Politics

Fracturing Along Fault Lines

The panoply of liberal and Leftist policies are harmful to society

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Biden and company want to contort the right to vote, endlessly fund Ukraine, kowtow to Middle East terrorists, pack the Supreme Court, end the filibuster, disband the electoral college, treat January 6th protestors like insurrectionists, convict Trump on SOMETHING, appease China, and permanently make tens of millions of Americans totally dependent on government entitlements.

In recent years, the questionable lockdowns, restrictions, and mandates over COVID-19, and Democrats’ willingness to overlook street violence, enhances my view that the Left loves the idea of total authority and forevermore imposing its will on all of us.

Insanity Over the Top

The panoply of liberal or Leftist viewpoints, from no need for voter ID to restrictions on the 1st Amendment, to indoctrinating children is harmful to society.

Is it acceptable to teach children that there are more than 50 genders? Do you believe, as Leftists do that children may choose their gender? Do you think that cross-dressers ought to be reading to children at story hour? Should the sciences, mathematics, and other core academic disciplines be taught to accommodate ‘politically diverse’ points of view?

Are you okay with colleges holding separate graduation exercises and celebrations for different ethnic minorities? Martin Luther King, Jr, must be rolling over in his grave. Should entire college curricula be redesigned because most of the great works of literature throughout history have been written by white males?

Should student loans be exonerated? Should colleges establish safe spaces? Are you perturbed when conservative speakers are disrupted from speaking on campus, or are banned from campus? Curiously, can a university promise students an unbiased education when 97% of college professors’ political donations go to Democrats?

Open the Spigots!

Should Medicare be provided for all and, if so, how do you pay for it? Is late-trimester abortion acceptable? After a baby is born, is it the right of the mother and the doctor to choose whether or not that person will continue to live?

Should we have open borders, and let in anyone who wants to come here, now approaching 9 million since Biden was installed? Are illegal immigrants to be given free healthcare once they cross the border, as all Democrat presidential contenders stated on live TV in 2020? How do hordes arrive at the southern border, well-fed and hydrated, after trekking 100s or 1000s of miles, with sturdy walking shoes and cell phones? Should they be flown and bussed all over the U.S. courtesy of the Biden administration? Are sanctuary cities a good idea, and do they support the lives and aspirations of actual U.S. citizens?

When newspaper headlines scream about gun violence, is wringing your hands over the issue any solace for families in Chicago or Baltimore ghetto communities who experience gun violence on a daily basis? Do you care about the issue, or do you only get riled up when the mainstream media stokes your emotions by giving World War II coverage to carefully crafted, elevated cases?

Is calling others racist acceptable when, in your own heart, you know that you are biased at times against this group or that? Is virtue signaling an acceptable form of social participation, or should one actually take appropriate, non-violent action to address a perceived wrong? Is a comment from 30 or 40 years ago made by a celebrity — or a politician, for that matter — enough to cancel his or her career?

Goals and Tactics of Violent Groups

Are the goals and violent tactics of Antifa acceptable to you? If they’re proud of what they stand for and forthright in their actions, why do they wear ski masks? Appearing in selected cities in time to cause trouble, and leading the turmoil following the death of George Floyd, how many of them actually hold jobs?

In pursuit of protests, do any pay for their own transportation and housing costs? If they do not pay for themselves, who is paying? Most curiously, why do they often go after the most vulnerable people they can find in any gathering? Is it okay when law enforcement stands down in the face of violence committed by those on the left?

The Left embraces mass insanity and it’s getting more absurd all the time. Yet, it appears that Leftists do not understand the magnitude and ramifications of many of their political and social views. Their agenda, fully implemented, would destroy our civilization in less than a few years.
One Generation

Ronald Reagan said, “Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn’t pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same, or one day we will spend our sunset years telling our children and our children’s children what it was once like in the United States where men [and women] were free.”

It would be nice to reach consensus, in some way, with those on the Left, however, my sensibilities cry out and say that would be cultural and national suicide.

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