Diversity=Disunity. Rediscovering the American Dream is our only hope. ⋆
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Diversity=Disunity. Rediscovering the American Dream is our only hope.

Photo credit: Luke Stackpoole

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We become not a melting pot but a beautiful mosaic. Different people, different beliefs, different yearnings, different hopes, different dreams. ~Jimmy Carter

Let’s talk about the dream that once made our nation strong. This vision has nothing to do with differing anything. Where once our differences were incidental; they’re now monumental. What can we do to overcome our obstacles and achieve real unity? Rediscover our shared American Dream.

The American Dream once beckoned hopeful immigrants to come for the chance to build new lives through opportunity and freedom. If they could only get to our shores, they reasoned, they could work hard to become citizens in a nation that, far from perfect, afforded them the best chance to build new and better lives.

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What happened to the American Dream? It’s been lost to the limiting, shaming and militant god of cultural diversity. If my grandfather had arrived in 2021 instead of 1909, he would find a once promising and relatively united country torn and tugged by division and a glorification of all things different.

Building barriers, not bridges

Instead of discovering a diverse nation of fellow immigrants and new citizens united by a shared dream, he’d be encouraged to cling to his cultural heritage and to resist embracing American culture—the very culture his family had scrimped and saved and sacrificed everything to join.

My grandfather would be confronted by his supposed “white privilege” even though he was more olive than white. America’s diversity dealers would demand he accept his white guilt and embrace his tribe. They don’t build bridges; they build barriers by glorifying differences.

Our once shared American Dream has been trampled and trumped by a small, but vocal minority who decry its legitimacy. A dream that galvanized generations of immigrants has been replaced by a glorification of cultural diversity.

There’s nothing wrong with cultural diversity per se—but there’s everything wrong with it when it divides rather than unites us. Diversity, with the right perspective and emphasis, makes us uniquely American.

Diversity as America

What began as a rekindling of interest in our rich ethnic and cultural origins has become an elevation of all things diverse. And by making diversity an obsession, proponents have denigrated the idea of conforming to a shared national identity.

Here’s a fun factoid:

According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the word “diversity” only acquired its present-day ethnic focus as recently as 1992. Since then, diversity means so much more than … well, what it actually means.

Contrary to our leaders in education, politics and the spirit of the age, diversity does not make for a Utopian paradise of differing and self-contained, yet somehow cohesive mini-cultures. Neither does it weave a strong national tapestry or create a beautiful mosaic. What did diversity mean before its meaning was co-opted?

Diversity is rooted in the Latin word, diversitatem (nominative diversitas), which means contrariety, contradiction, or disagreement. Disagreement naturally occurs when people of differing cultures, ethnicities, religions and worldviews focus on their differences. Diversity is a cousin to discord, which is inevitable—just as my words will create discord. Worthwhile diversity is about commitment, not division.

Commitment is constitutional

In America, what unites people with differences is a commitment to a common dream: Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. This is a central tenet of our Constitution, which, by the way, immigrants swear by before they become citizens.

The oath, in part, is this: I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen; that I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America … that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same.

Renounce allegiance … bear true faith? These words confirm a commitment to a uniquely American way of thinking, an embrace of uniquely American values and dreams. The words of the oath are a commitment to … dun dun DUN … assimilation.

Assimilation good, tribalism bad

Sadly, assimilation has been made a dirty word just as “melting pot” has been made a dirty phrase. Here’s the truth—an immigrant cannot truly commit to becoming an American nor fulfill his or her oath without assimilating.

The idea that successful immigration can occur without assimilation is a relatively new construct—and it’s naturally illogical. A foolish, mouthy minority has convinced a generation of young minds that a culture with differing beliefs, yearnings, hopes and dreams makes for a stronger society and nation. This is nonsense.

Here’s more truth: A culture with different people with differing beliefs and points of origin can be strong—but only if its people are united by a common dream. 

Consider the world-changing actions of our “Greatest Generation.” Ask an elderly American what made his or her country great. They certainly don’t cringe at the mention of a melting pot. If they’re honest—and most are—they’ll tell you Jimmy Carter is full of it.

Issue of the heart

This quote by a much more effective president make much more sense: “Citizens by birth or choice, of a common country, that country has a right to concentrate your affections.” ~George Washington

This seems like “nationalism” because it is. Is nationalism also a dirty word? It is now. Somehow, to be a nationalistic nation is to be a racist one—even though our country have been its strongest, wisest and best when we’ve been the most nationalistic. Is it wrong to be a nationalistic superpower? Not when a nation balances its greatness with goodness.

The greatest nations in history were powerful, altruistic and influential in their time. And they were nationalistic … without being Nazi. Take this test: Think about the word nationalism. Does Nazi or Alt Right come to mind? If so, have you been influenced by an ideology?

Conversely, if nationalism makes you think about our nation coming together after Pearl Harbor or 9-11, maybe your mind is still free and historically sensitive and unencumbered by propaganda.

Logic over lunacy

Let’s look at this logically. Allow me to ask some penetrating questions regarding this diversity-as-virtue motif:

When athletes on a sports team hold differing beliefs about how to reach their goal of winning a championship, will they be as likely to become champions? If soldiers in an army have different ideas about how to win a battle and aren’t willing to follow the battle plan, will the army be as effective a fighting force?

When employees of a company don’t conform to a singular business model to achieve profitability, will the company stand the best chance to succeed? If we hold differing beliefs, yearnings, hopes and dreams, can we be strong as a nation?

Never too late

Yes, we can, but only if we lose the hyphen and see ourselves as Americans first and foremost. We desperately need to re-examine this infatuation with elevating and glorifying cultural differences. If you want to appreciate other cultures, please do so, but don’t do it at the expense of a shared American culture.

The opportunity to pursue happiness and the American Dream can be as inviting, accepting and amazing for us and our children and grandchildren as it was for our great-grandparents and their parents.

We’re different, but let’s be different together—as Americans. Let’s resist the diversity despots who create barriers between us by glorifying our differences. By coming together, we can recapture what Americans do best—excel by pursuing a shared dream of freedom, opportunity and goodness through a shared commitment.

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Patrick is a journalist and writer with degrees in English and journalism. He served six years in the Navy where his life was changed forever by the Lord Jesus Christ. He lives in the Sierra Nevada of Northern California with his wife, dog and two cats. He enjoys hiking and cycling, taking pictures and blogging at https://luscri.com/



 
 
 

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News

Six Dozen One-Sentence Tips on Reducing Stress

Under Biden, the nation’s stress level, collectively and individually, keeps ratcheting higher

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As we enter year three of the “Biden Administration,” enduring a clown who was installed, not elected, the nation’s stress level, collectively and individually, keeps ratcheting higher. As such, here are more than six dozen one-sentence tips on reducing stress for your edification:

Half the battle in alleviating stress is simply being aware of how you react to situations.
Let go of low level decisions.
It’s hard to feel stressed when you’re looking good.
You feel less stress if you allow yourself to be who you really are.

Take a break by helping someone else with their problems
To win the war on stress requires you only need small consistent steps.
Make your boss look good–he or she will appreciate it.
One good laugh can change your whole temperament.

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If a choice is of little consequence, let someone else choose.
Given enough time, people will usually apologize for blowing up at you undeservedly.
For most people, most of the time, most of the stress they encounter is self-induced.
Narrow your priorities and focus on what’s vital– the clock of your life is ticking.

Never make a promise you can’t keep.
If someone tells you to “take it easy,” heed the advice.
Give yourself quiet time throughout the day.
Sing in your car – it’s the best stress reducer when barreling down the highway.

Allow yourself five minutes to worry, then put the issues in the back of your mind.
Look for the best in others.
Screen your calls; you don’t have time to be available to everybody.
You always have the option of not answering the door.

Find ways to make yourself indispensable on the job.
Combat perfectionism because you are not perfect; nobody is.
It could always be worse; try to find the good points in everything.
Treat your children as full-fledged human beings.

Be true to yourself; don’t jump off a cliff simply because the lemmings are.
Build your life on a solid base, then don’t worry about the foundation.
Strive for objectivity.
Accept input and advice from trusted others.

Be conscious of what you say to yourself.
Compete with yourself, not others.
Challenge yourself to perform better than you have in the past.
Never mind the symptoms – get to the root causes of issues you face.

Avoid participating in the rumor mill.
Your instinct will often guide you – don’t be afraid to listen to it.
Don’t let juggling tasks become procrastination.
Take long, deep breaths whenever you choose to.

To feel more content be less concerned with what others think about you.
Move with a purpose.
Revenge is almost always counterproductive.
Delegate, delegate, delegate.

Open your mail over the wastebasket.
Laughter can lower your blood pressure.
When you’re under stress, sips of water can make you feel better.
For more energy, ignore the clock and go to bed when you’re tired.

You can’t use of all the promotions and bonus offers you encounter – so don’t worry about them.
Jumping into water changes your outlook.
Take responsibility for your mistakes rather than trying to assign blame.
The key to organization that works every time is grouping similar items together.

The hardest task is doing something different from the way you’ve always done it.
Let negative comments fall away like water off a duck’s back.
When you have trouble finding your way, step back and look at the big picture.
Look for the good in others and they’ll see the good in you.

Treat new employees with the same respect you show your CEO.
Let go of the excess and clutter in your life.
Avoid making decisions in anger.
Build enough slack into your schedule to deal with routine upsets.

Over-focusing on yourself leads to eye strain.
Step back and develop perspective – will you recall what’s bothering you, a month from now?
All else being equal, the better shape you’re in, the less stressed you’ll experience.
Learn from your mistakes or prepare to repeat them.

There is nothing so stressful as attempting to be someone you are not.
Be on the lookout for distraction-free sanctuaries, wherever they are.
Challenge yourself to make small improvements daily, and big ones will follow.
The best results often show up a day or two after you thought they would.

Regard each stressful experience as an opportunity to learn.
You cannot change the past but you can always learn from it.
Use the stairs instead of the elevator.
There’s always more to learn, so enjoy the process.

The natural state of human beings is alertness, health, and mental clarity.
Boil it down – get to the essence of things.
Acknowledge the accomplishments of others; everyone seeks acknowledgment.
Despite it all, maintain your ethical standards.

Give your complete and undivided attention to one task at a time.
Have fun with new ways of doing things – don’t let your habits become ingrained.
Practice the art of doing one thing at a time .

 

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Business

Smart Move in a Rough Economy: Help Your Boss to Shine

Stay on top of your job, your department’s goals, and your company’s objectives

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Making your boss look good can only reflect favorably on you. Both your boss and his or her supervisors will appreciate this.

The best way to make your boss look good is to handle your work efficiently and thoroughly. If your boss is fair, he or she will give you credit for the work, increasing your chances of promotion.

If your boss is not doing his or her share of the work, leaning on you unfairly without giving you the credit, it’s still likely that you’ll be promoted when your boss is promoted. That person knows you’ve been doing more than your share, and he or she won’t be able to take a new position without your help.

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Becoming a Mentor to Others

Maybe you’re only 27 years old, or perhaps you’ve only been with your present firm for a year and a half. Yet, with your previous experience and achievements, you may already be in a position to serve as a mentor to junior members of your organization. This can be accomplished on an informal, ad hoc basis, and you can literally choose the amount of energy you’re willing to commit. Helping junior members always looks good to those above you, especially at performance review time.

Stay on top of your job, your department’s goals, and your company’s objectives. This three-way strategy includes reviewing your job description, deciding precisely what your department’s goals are, and determining your company’s objectives:

Your Job Description

First, knowing your job description and honoring it, or amending it if necessary, protect you from any misunderstandings. It will also give you an idea of the part you play in the total picture of the organization, an important factor in your work satisfaction and chance of promotion.

Your job description ideally contains all the important activities of your position, the knowledge you need to have or acquire to perform those activities, and some sense of your overall role. If your job description does not adequately detail the information you need to know and the responsibilities you have, now is the time to change it.

Company Goals

Second, learn and understand the goals of your part of the company. By whatever method your organization is broken into groups — department, division, project team — your group has objectives.

Goals are important to guide actions as well as to mark milestones. Knowing your group’s goals will help you to set priorities for your own work and make wise decisions concerning how jobs can best be done.

What is the Mission?

Finally, be aware of your organization’s mission. Any organization, from the smallest business to the multibillion-dollar corporation, has a mission. If you don’t already know it, find out. Your organization’s brochure, annual report, promotional literature, or employee handbook will have the mission spelled out.

The mission will unify and give meaning to all the division or department goals. Although conflicts among divisions will occur because of the nature of different responsibilities, a solid base can be produced when all employees realize the overall mission of the organization.

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