America's Most Inspirational Rabbi Discusses Politics and Culture - Politicrossing
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America’s Most Inspirational Rabbi Discusses Politics and Culture

Chris Widener and the Rabbi discuss the differences between various Jewish groups, the political situation in America, how Jewish people view the culture around them and how to find your purpose in life.

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PolitiCrossing founder Chris Widener recently sat down with one of America’s most inspirational Rabbis, Rabbi Pinchas Allouche from Scottsdale, Arizona. Rabbi Allouche is the Rabbi of Congregation Beth Tefillah.

Chris and the Rabbi discussed the differences between various Jewish groups, the political situation in America, how Jewish people view the culture around them and how to find your purpose in life.

Rabbi Allouche is also the founding Rabbi of Congregation Beth Tefillah of Scottsdale, which is among the most vibrant and fastest growing synagogues in the State of Arizona. The 2018 Grand Opening Ceremony of Congregation Beth Tefillah’s new synagogue was attended by numerous influential individuals, including World Leaders, US Government Officials, State of Israel Representatives, and acclaimed Religious Dignitaries.

It was during this momentous occasion that Arizona’s Honorable Governor Doug Ducey praised Rabbi Allouche and his congregation for their significant contribution to the Community.

Just a couple of months following this historic event, in January of 2019, Rabbi Allouche was honored to be invited to Arizona’s State Capital to deliver an Invocation Speech at the 2019 Inauguration of Governor Doug Ducey. Shortly thereafter, in February of 2019, Rabbi Allouche went on to deliver an equally inspiring and unifying Invocation Speech for Scottsdale’s Mayor, Jim Lane, during his State of the City Address.

Aside from being dedicated to leading and growing his synagogue and empowering his local community in Scottsdale, Rabbi Allouche also seeks to bring healing to an increasingly troubled and divisive world through making himself available to deliver powerful and uplifting motivational speeches, both to religious and non-religious audiences.

Having lived in five countries on four different continents and being fluent in English, Hebrew, French, and Italian, Rabbi Allouche is able to form lasting connections with people from many different backgrounds. Rabbi Allouche also uses his unique expertise and interpersonal communication skills to offer consulting, mentoring, and counseling services to groups of various sizes and to individuals from every walk of life.

Chris is one of the World's Top 50 Speakers, member of the Motivational Speakers Hall of Fame, and one of Inc. Magazine's Top 100 Leadership Speakers. He considers it a privilege to be able to speak to people, help them lead successful lives, become extraordinary leaders and, masterful salespeople. Chris has authored twenty books with three million copies in print in 13 languages and over 450 articles on success, leadership, sales and motivation.



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The Great Con Pt 4: The Racism Con

America is the least racist we have ever been!

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PolitiCrossing Founder Chris Widener explains the Great Con the left uses to convince races to hate each other so they can be separated into voting blocks. Yet America is the least racist we have ever been!

Mic.com has this to say about a recent survey:

“The study was aimed at discerning a correlation between a country’s level of economic freedom and its racial tolerance. The latter was defined by one simple question, as asked in the World Values Survey: Whom would you not want as a neighbor? Those who selected “people of other races” were categorized as intolerant for the purposes of this investigation. Countries were then ranked by percentage of responses: the fewer “intolerant” respondents, the more tolerant the country. While the Swedish researches found no conclusive results regarding any strong correlation between economic development and tolerance, a recent Washington Post article article went back to the original survey source and compiled a greater sample of data for the purposes of determining other potential relationships between a country and its perceived level of tolerance.

“According to this infographic, the U.S. falls into the most tolerant category, with only 0-4.9% of those surveyed responding that they would not want to live near people of other races. Our neighbor to the north responded in kind, while Mexico ranked in the second-tier of tolerance, making the totality of North America look like a big amalgamation of racial harmony.”

Here is Chris Widener on the Great Racism Con:

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Turner Classic Movies Starts “Reframed Classics” to Look at “Problematic” Classic Movies

In other words, take a look under the hood and tell you where they are bad and how you are bad for liking them.

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If you thought cancel culture might be waning, you are incorrect. Seems like the left just has to keep after anything and everything that was good in our country in the past. Take classic movies for example…

According to NBC Connecticut:

“Loving classic films can be a fraught pastime. Just consider the cultural firestorm over “Gone With the Wind” this past summer. No one knows this better than the film lovers at Turner Classic Movies who daily are confronted with the complicated reality that many of old Hollywood’s most celebrated films are also often a kitchen sink of stereotypes. This summer, amid the Black Lives Matter protests, the channel’s programmers and hosts decided to do something about it.

“The result is a new series, “ Reframed Classics,” which promises wide-ranging discussions about 18 culturally significant films from the 1920s through the 1960s that also have problematic aspects, from “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” and Mickey Rooney’s performance as Mr. Yunioshi to Fred Astaire’s blackface routine in “Swing Time.” It kicks off Thursday at 8 p.m. ET with none other than “Gone With the Wind.”

“We know millions of people love these films,” said TCM host Jacqueline Stewart, who is participating in many of the conversations. “We’re not saying this is how you should feel about ‘Pyscho’ or this is how you should feel about ‘Gone with the Wind.’ We’re just trying to model ways of having longer and deeper conversations and not just cutting it off to ‘I love this movie. I hate this movie.’ There’s so much space in between.”

So they are going to take a look at old movies that tens of millions – perhaps hundreds of millions – of people have loved over the years and “revisit” them. In other words, take a look under the hood and tell you where they are bad and how you are bad for liking them.

Along with Gone with the Wind, Psycho and Breakfast at Tiffany’s, here are some of the other movies in the left’s sights:

Swing Time
Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner
Gunga Din
The Searchers
My Fair Lady
Stagecoach
Woman of the Year
The Children’s Hour

NBC Connectucut reports:

“For “Psycho,” which will be airing on March 25, the hosts talk about transgender identity in the film and the implications of equating gender fluidity and dressing in women’s clothes with mental illness and violence. It also sparks a bigger conversation about sexuality in Alfred Hitchcock films.”

Is this just reading into something that doesn’t exist? Is it a waste of time? Should we look at these old movies and see anything other than the perspectives of people from another time? Or should we cancel them?

According to the host, she wants to have people discuss rather than cancel the movies. We’ll see:

The goal of “Reframed Classics” is to help give audiences the tools to discuss films from a different era and not just dismiss or cancel them. And Stewart, for her part, doesn’t believe that you can simply remove problematic films from the culture.

“I think there’s something to be learned from any work of art,” Stewart said. “They’re all historical artifacts that tell us a lot about the industry in which they were made, the cultures that they were speaking to.”

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