9 Signs You Might Be Arrogant and Not Know It - Politicrossing
Connect with us
Photo by Marcelo Chagas from Pexels Photo by Marcelo Chagas from Pexels

Faith

9 Signs You Might Be Arrogant and Not Know It

Being the #1 most arrogant person in the world, I figure that makes me the world’s topmost leading expert on the subject.

Photo by Marcelo Chagas from Pexels

Published

on

Note: This article was originally published on the Honestly Thinking blog.

I am the most arrogant person in the world.

Really, it’s true. Don’t believe me? Then clearly you aren’t nearly as intelligent or wise as me to be able to figure it out.

And being the #1 most arrogant person in the world, I figure that makes me the world’s topmost leading expert on the subject.

The truth is God has really been kicking my butt over the last few years (especially this last year), progressively revealing my level of arrogance. Like peeling layers of an onion (each producing a few more tears), I’ve come to discover areas of egotism I never knew existed before.

We are all familiar with the braggadocios, narcissistic personality types – the ones who very openly make every conversation and outward action about themselves. But what we are not as acquainted with is the much more subtler symptoms of pride – the ones that often go undetected but are ultimately just as destructive to you and those around you.

In discovering these signs, I’ve learned that they are detectable when you analyze your motivations and ask yourself if they are centered around one or more of the following: self-importance, self-preservation, or self-empowerment. Each one, of course, makes it all about you. And as I’ve come to find out, I’ve made life a lot more about me than I previously realized.

The thing is, while you will never surpass me in arrogance (not even close), it’s possible that as you analyze the three motivators in relation to your life, you might discover you too have arrogance and didn’t realize it.

Thus, I present to you at least 9 Signs You Might be Arrogant and Not Know It:

#1: You are a perfectionist.

Your value and self-importance are entirely centered around maintaining perfection in every aspect of your life. For others to see you fail would be an embarrassment to who you are. It is a chaotic world we live in, so you find yourself frequently going into self-preservation mode rather than risk allowing anything that might threaten your perfectly controlled little world.

#2: Others are afraid to be themselves around you.

A side-effect of your perfectionism is the devastating wake it leaves on those close to you. You see any imperfections in them as potentially introducing chaos into your controlled world, so you judge them. Even if you never outwardly express those judgments, they sense it. Besides, they witness the perfections you demand of yourself, so they assume you demand the same of them. The result is those around you are intimated by you and never feel safe to reveal their failures or be themselves.

#3: You are a people-pleaser.

People-pleasing feels like a selfless act. After all, what can be more servant-like than to bring joy to others? But the truth is it gives you a sense of empowerment to make others feel happy. In addition, people-pleasing is frequently self-preservational as it becomes a way of maintaining the peace. A good sign these are your motivators is you become depressed or anxious when others aren’t happy – meaning it was really more about you than them. The only way to truly be a loving servant is to be willing to speak and act out in truth regardless of the other person’s response.

#4: You are shy.

Another tricky one because shyness is actually pride disguised as humility. Different than “introversion” in which a person finds social interactions simply exhausting, shyness is when you avoid interacting with people with the subconscious attempt of rejecting them before they could possibly reject you – thus, self-preservation and self-importance. The result of this selfish act is that you fail to share with others the gift of the real you.

#5: You worry and complain.

Similar to perfectionism, the chaos of this world frightens you. Unable to bring it under physical control, you seek empowerment by making yourself a “god” of this world through your mind. You thus judge the world and create your own universe of endless scenarios, both good and bad, rather than find peace through dependency and trust in the real God who is in control.

#6: You continually struggle with negative behavior, bad habits or addictions.

As the proverb states, “Pride goes before destruction, and a haughty spirit before a fall.” Thus, if you do a lot of falling, it’s worth examining if there’s a lot of pride to go with it. What proceeded your negative behavior? Were you feeling self-important? Were things out of control and, thus, you empowered yourself with worry? Were you afraid people might see the real, imperfect and needy you – so you failed to open yourself up or rely on other’s help?

#7: You struggle with feelings of shame.

Shame is another form of pride disguised as humility. Stemming from the consequences of negative behavior, it is the counterpart to perfectionism from which you derive your value. Recognizing your nakedness and imperfection, you try to beat yourself into submission and you hide from God and others. The problem is this only starts a continuous cycle of shame, hiding and trying to cover yourself with further negative behaviors. The only way to find freedom from the cycle is to open yourself up to God and others, allowing them to see and accept you for who you really are – imperfections and all.

#8: You ‘splain things to people.

Whether it’s gender ‘splaining, generational ‘splaining, political ‘splaining, race ‘splaining, faith ‘splaining or any other kind of ‘splaining, your goal is to try to “educate” the less informed regarding the greater wisdom self-important you has clearly arrived at. While it is vital we share our knowledge and ideas, there is a fine line between opening up gracious, listening and learning dialogue verses pridefully demonstrating how your factual reasoning is superior to others’ erroneous ways.

‘Splaining doesn’t just happen with divisive issues. When someone faces confusing, difficult or even tragic circumstances, you are quick to pull out the latest research, famous quote or Bible verse. Uncomfortable with unanswered questions, you feel self-empowered as you provide your ready-made response – forgetting there are real people hurting at the other end of those responses and failing to recognize there are simply things for which there are no good answers.

#9: You’ve been “falsely” accused of being arrogant.

While I’m a firm believer we get our identity from God and not the opinions of others, I also strongly believe that when someone criticizes you, no matter how baseless the claims, you should always examine to see if there might be a bit of truth … even if only 1%. Thus, if someone ever calls you “arrogant,” it’s worth examining if there is an ounce of truth. I had some unfounded, and even cruel and inappropriate, accusations against me in the last few years, but when I examined them for the 1%, I discovered, lo and behold, I not only had arrogance, I was the most arrogant person in the world.

* * *

I don’t know about you, but I have been guilty of all the above. And as I continually examine through the lens of self-importance, self-preservation and self-empowerment, layers upon layers continue to surface. Quite honestly, it has felt devastating.

How could I have a heart so utterly self-centered? How could my interactions with the ones I love be so much more about me than them?

And are my writings more exercises of the ego than attempts at authentic dialogue? Are the words I write to you even now an effort at self-importance?

But am I alone in this? According to Christ himself I am not allowed to judge. I must first scrutinize this colossal log in my own eye before I attempt to remove the tiny spec in others.

But if I’m being honest, as I peer out around the corners of this massive plank, as an expert on arrogance I see glimpses of it oozing out from every seam of society.

I see it in every other social media post. I see it in all the political dialogue as we label people and share words that generalize and mock whole groups for their differing ideas.

I see it in shares that seem focused more on generating reactions and “likes” than in expressing genuine servanthood love for others.

I see it in how we self-preserve by hiding behind our screens rather than risk face to face social interaction.

I see it in the ways we are afraid to ask for help or openly admit we are struggling.

I see it in how many people remain bound by shame and try to cover it by either shaming others or numbing it through self-destructive behaviors and addictions.

So immersed in arrogance are we … am I … that I sometimes wonder if there’s any hope. Do any of us even know what humility looks like?

But amidst the devastating blows … behind the tears as layer upon layer are peeled away revealing my selfish arrogance … I am occasionally reminded.

I am reminded of what true humility looks like … by the very one who has every right to lord greatness over us.

Humility looks like the one who some 13 ½ billion years ago spoke and a universe of billions of galaxies was created, yet some 2000 years ago allowed itself to be born an “illegitimate” child of a teenage girl amidst an oppressed people on a tiny planet.

Humility looks like the person that had done no wrong and had every right to stone a woman who had arrogantly cheated on her betrothed, yet he chose to say instead, “I do not condemn.”

Humility looks like the one who could have chosen to be like the Pagan gods of the surrounding culture who created humankind to be their slaves, yet he chose instead to kneel half-naked before people he called “friends” and proceeded like a servant to wash their dirty feet.

Humility looks like a starving man 40 days in the wilderness who could have called upon his own identity in order to preserve and empower himself and to demand his place of importance yet denied all three possibilities in order to submit himself to a selfless purpose.

Humility looks to the person who could have easily made himself a king, yet chose to elevate women, children, the poor and the outcasts.

Humility looks like the one who could have called upon thousands of angels to protect him, yet willingly submitted himself to death on a cross in order to remove shame from the very ones who were hurting him.

Humility looks like the one whose name brings powerful chills every time I speak of it. Humility looks like Jesus.

Could I ever hope to be anything like that?

After all, since all things were created through him, it seems to me we should have a universe created for humility.

Or do I just continually repeat the cycle of Adam and Eve? Tempted by the chaos, instead of becoming an image bearer of a selfless, loving God, I enthrone myself to become my own little selfish “god” in control of my environment? Embarrassed by my nakedness and imperfections, I hide in shame, ineffectively trying to cover myself with “fig leaf” habits while pointing in others’ direction.

Humility seems so far removed from me.

But that’s the thing. Perhaps I was never meant to be perfect. Perhaps grace was always part of the deal. After all, scripture tells us that “grace was given us in Christ Jesus before the beginning of time.”

“Who told you that you were naked?” asked God as Adam and Eve cowered in unnecessary shame.

Perhaps we were never perfect but were always perfectly loved.

And regardless of my arrogance, of my selfishness, of my imperfections … I can rest in that.

That humbles me. Knowing that I am perfectly loved without fault, I can then seek to be more like him irrespective of stumbles along the way.

I am the most loved and forgiven person in the world.

Don’t believe me?

Then it is simply my hope that someday you might discover this same kind of love and forgiveness for yourself.

Husband, father, TV producer, author of "Rethinking God," and blogger - Honestly thinking (& rethinking) about God, the universe, and everything in between.



  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Join the conversation!

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, profanity, vulgarity, doxing, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain fruitful conversation.



Faith

The Great Con Pt 4: The Racism Con

America is the least racist we have ever been!

Published

on

PolitiCrossing Founder Chris Widener explains the Great Con the left uses to convince races to hate each other so they can be separated into voting blocks. Yet America is the least racist we have ever been!

Mic.com has this to say about a recent survey:

“The study was aimed at discerning a correlation between a country’s level of economic freedom and its racial tolerance. The latter was defined by one simple question, as asked in the World Values Survey: Whom would you not want as a neighbor? Those who selected “people of other races” were categorized as intolerant for the purposes of this investigation. Countries were then ranked by percentage of responses: the fewer “intolerant” respondents, the more tolerant the country. While the Swedish researches found no conclusive results regarding any strong correlation between economic development and tolerance, a recent Washington Post article article went back to the original survey source and compiled a greater sample of data for the purposes of determining other potential relationships between a country and its perceived level of tolerance.

“According to this infographic, the U.S. falls into the most tolerant category, with only 0-4.9% of those surveyed responding that they would not want to live near people of other races. Our neighbor to the north responded in kind, while Mexico ranked in the second-tier of tolerance, making the totality of North America look like a big amalgamation of racial harmony.”

Here is Chris Widener on the Great Racism Con:

Continue Reading

Faith

Turner Classic Movies Starts “Reframed Classics” to Look at “Problematic” Classic Movies

In other words, take a look under the hood and tell you where they are bad and how you are bad for liking them.

Published

on

If you thought cancel culture might be waning, you are incorrect. Seems like the left just has to keep after anything and everything that was good in our country in the past. Take classic movies for example…

According to NBC Connecticut:

“Loving classic films can be a fraught pastime. Just consider the cultural firestorm over “Gone With the Wind” this past summer. No one knows this better than the film lovers at Turner Classic Movies who daily are confronted with the complicated reality that many of old Hollywood’s most celebrated films are also often a kitchen sink of stereotypes. This summer, amid the Black Lives Matter protests, the channel’s programmers and hosts decided to do something about it.

“The result is a new series, “ Reframed Classics,” which promises wide-ranging discussions about 18 culturally significant films from the 1920s through the 1960s that also have problematic aspects, from “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” and Mickey Rooney’s performance as Mr. Yunioshi to Fred Astaire’s blackface routine in “Swing Time.” It kicks off Thursday at 8 p.m. ET with none other than “Gone With the Wind.”

“We know millions of people love these films,” said TCM host Jacqueline Stewart, who is participating in many of the conversations. “We’re not saying this is how you should feel about ‘Pyscho’ or this is how you should feel about ‘Gone with the Wind.’ We’re just trying to model ways of having longer and deeper conversations and not just cutting it off to ‘I love this movie. I hate this movie.’ There’s so much space in between.”

So they are going to take a look at old movies that tens of millions – perhaps hundreds of millions – of people have loved over the years and “revisit” them. In other words, take a look under the hood and tell you where they are bad and how you are bad for liking them.

Along with Gone with the Wind, Psycho and Breakfast at Tiffany’s, here are some of the other movies in the left’s sights:

Swing Time
Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner
Gunga Din
The Searchers
My Fair Lady
Stagecoach
Woman of the Year
The Children’s Hour

NBC Connectucut reports:

“For “Psycho,” which will be airing on March 25, the hosts talk about transgender identity in the film and the implications of equating gender fluidity and dressing in women’s clothes with mental illness and violence. It also sparks a bigger conversation about sexuality in Alfred Hitchcock films.”

Is this just reading into something that doesn’t exist? Is it a waste of time? Should we look at these old movies and see anything other than the perspectives of people from another time? Or should we cancel them?

According to the host, she wants to have people discuss rather than cancel the movies. We’ll see:

The goal of “Reframed Classics” is to help give audiences the tools to discuss films from a different era and not just dismiss or cancel them. And Stewart, for her part, doesn’t believe that you can simply remove problematic films from the culture.

“I think there’s something to be learned from any work of art,” Stewart said. “They’re all historical artifacts that tell us a lot about the industry in which they were made, the cultures that they were speaking to.”

Continue Reading

Our Newsletter

Become a Politicrossing insider: Sign up for our free email newsletter, and we'll make sure to keep you in the loop.

Our Newsletter

Become a Politicrossing insider: Sign up for our free email newsletter, and we'll make sure to keep you in the loop.

Trending

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!
 
Send this to a friend